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Cleaning up and Maintaining Cstands


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#1 Eric Kline

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 09:15 AM

I have a small grip and lighting package that I rent out to smaller productions such as documentaries and short films. Recently, I let my kit go out on a shoot and it was apparently 5 days of rain with a lot of exterior work. The gear came back a little soggy and now my Cstands have started to stick when I try to spread them out. Do you guys have any suggestions on what a proper way to maintain Matthews 40" stands would be? I've heard WD40 and steel wool, but thought I'd check with you guys first.

thanks in advance.
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#2 Ross Neugeboren

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 01:15 PM

I notice that no one has replied to this thread, so perhaps the best idea would be to contact Matthews directly. http://www.msegrip.c...hp?show=contact
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#3 robert duke

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 10:54 PM

I notice that no one has replied to this thread, so perhaps the best idea would be to contact Matthews directly. http://www.msegrip.c...hp?show=contact



everybody has their own "formula" From chrome polish to w-d40 to simple green. I like to use a synthetic scrubbie (like for dishes) with simple green, then chrome polish, then disassemble the heads, clean, and lubricate the head with white lithium grease in a tube ( more control over where it goes). This seems to keep the stands nice and smooth.
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 12:50 PM

everybody has their own "formula" From chrome polish to w-d40 to simple green. I like to use a synthetic scrubbie (like for dishes) with simple green, then chrome polish, then disassemble the heads, clean, and lubricate the head with white lithium grease in a tube ( more control over where it goes). This seems to keep the stands nice and smooth.


This seems like a much better method than steel wool. Steel wool will eventually remove all of the chrome plating and your stands will rust.
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#5 JD Hartman

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 01:42 PM

This seems like a much better method than steel wool. Steel wool will eventually remove all of the chrome plating and your stands will rust.


The fact is the green kitchen Scotchbrite pads are actually more abrasive than some grades of steel wool. They can easily abrade steel and plated finishes. If you're going to use a 3M Scotchbrite pad, they make an entire range of them, in various grades for cleaning and polishing. See their website for more information.
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#6 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 12:53 AM

The fact is the green kitchen Scotchbrite pads are actually more abrasive than some grades of steel wool. They can easily abrade steel and plated finishes. If you're going to use a 3M Scotchbrite pad, they make an entire range of them, in various grades for cleaning and polishing. See their website for more information.




Hi JD,

I hope that you are doing well. I have a project about which you gave me a good suggestion last year that I hope to post some info. on soon.
(Yeah, last year, I know!)

I think that Robert may have been referring to Simple Green the cleaner that comes in a spray bottle rather than an abrasive pad.

Simple Green
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#7 robert duke

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 10:40 AM

Hi JD,

I hope that you are doing well. I have a project about which you gave me a good suggestion last year that I hope to post some info. on soon.
(Yeah, last year, I know!)

I think that Robert may have been referring to Simple Green the cleaner that comes in a spray bottle rather than an abrasive pad.

Simple Green


JD is right however, scotchbrite pads also come in different grades. I find that unless there is sever pitting of the chrome the Kitchen grade attached to a sponge found at the local grocery is sufficient. It isn't too abrasive but takes off any gunk. If you have sever pitting go for steel wool or the industrial scotchbtrite. Once pitting has begun there is no going back.
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#8 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 04:36 PM

JD is right however, scotchbrite pads also come in different grades. I find that unless there is sever pitting of the chrome the Kitchen grade attached to a sponge found at the local grocery is sufficient. It isn't too abrasive but takes off any gunk. If you have sever pitting go for steel wool or the industrial scotchbtrite. Once pitting has begun there is no going back.



"Once pitting has begun there is no going back."

I know! I had to keep a car outside for a couple years and if I had only taken the wheels off or at least coated them with wax or something
I wouldn't have pitted chrome reverse wheels (the old type that you can't even find anymore) now.
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#9 robert duke

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 12:42 AM

"Once pitting has begun there is no going back."

I know! I had to keep a car outside for a couple years and if I had only taken the wheels off or at least coated them with wax or something
I wouldn't have pitted chrome reverse wheels (the old type that you can't even find anymore) now.


Tim,
You might try that Magic Chrome Brush you can find at Auto part stores, my Dad swears by it with his British Cars.
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#10 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 03:17 PM

Tim,
You might try that Magic Chrome Brush you can find at Auto part stores, my Dad swears by it with his British Cars.




Thanks Robert, I'm going to parts store tomorrow; I'll check it out.
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#11 JD Hartman

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:16 AM

The problem with using steel wool is the broken strands that can be left behind, these will cause nasty looking rust stains. We don't use any steel wool in the shop, only woven synthetic pads or copper wool. If you have to clean something and your worried about the plating, try copper wool pads. I used to be able to get these in the dollar store, but now they are passing off plated steel pads as copper. Not the same. A green kitchen Scotch Brite pad is not the same as 3m's Industrial line of hand pads. Hopfully this link works: http://multimedia.mm...s6661XTCOrrrrQ-
Otherwise start here: http://solutions.3m....-Center/Search/
and download the Hand Finishing Systems document

Edited by JD Hartman, 03 August 2009 - 12:18 AM.

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#12 David Auner aac

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:59 AM

You might try that Magic Chrome Brush you can find at Auto part stores, my Dad swears by it with his British Cars.


Is that stuff the same as Neverdull?

Regards, Dave
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#13 John David Miller

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 09:30 PM

I have done plenty of work in very wet places like Hawaii and all over the Caribbean. I have found that a product called ACF50 is best against rust and corrosion. It is used in the aerospace industry and is a little pricey. Start with a heavier steel wool and work your way to a very fine.

http://www.corrosion...cts/acf-50.html

Now if one of my guys has pissed me off or came in late I'll have him wax the risers with a carnuba wax as well.
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#14 Chris J. Zahller

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 11:37 AM

I was going to post a question about this but found this thread. I recently acquired a pair of older Matthews C-stands with gobo arms from a movie stills photographer who doesn't use them in his work. They have some light surface rust on them. After reading the suggestions here I found numerous tutorials on cleaning chrome that recommend using wadded up aluminum foil dampened with plain tap water or with water + some mild dish soap.

 

Has anyone tried this method? How well did it work for you?

 

Another possibility for preventing further rust after cleaning, besides wax, grease, or chrome polish, is silicon spray. Any thoughts on that?

 

 

 

I have found that a product called ACF50 is best against rust and corrosion.

As this is an old thread, that link is dead. Does anyone know if this stuff is still available?

 

EDIT: It is still made. The manufacturer is Lear. According to the MSDS, the active ingredients are solvent naptha & hydrotreated neutral oil. Nothing special there; you could probably do just as well with pure mineral spirits followed by a protective top coat (wax, silicone, non-evaporating oil).


Edited by Chris J. Zahller, 28 May 2018 - 11:45 AM.

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#15 JD Hartman

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 12:36 PM

ACF-50 $18+ for an aerosol can on Amazon.  Not in my budget.

http://learchem.com/...cts/acf-50.html


Edited by JD Hartman, 28 May 2018 - 12:37 PM.

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#16 Chris J. Zahller

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 12:41 PM

ACF-50 $18+ for an aerosol can on Amazon.  Not in my budget.

http://learchem.com/...cts/acf-50.html

 

Yep; that's why I looked at the MSDS — to see if I could do the same without the high cost.


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#17 Chris J. Zahller

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 03:11 PM

I can now confirm that the aluminum/aluminium foil method works a treat. I did have a few pits in the chrome; the foil can't do much with those. A brass brush removes some of the rust pit & what's left can be kept from spreading by applying silicone or whatever to prevent moisture from getting to those areas.

 

Method:

  1. Crumple up large squares of heavy-duty aluminum foil into balls. You will need at least a couple per C-stand, depending on how rusty they are.
  2. Fill a container with warm water. Add a few drops of liquid dishwashing soap.
  3. Dip the foil in the water & scrub the chrome parts, rinsing frequently. A light touch is all you need for surface rust. Pitted areas will require the brass brush.
  4. Dry with a soft cloth.
  5. Apply chrome polish (e.g., Mother's California Gold) according to package directions. Allow to dry & buff off with a soft, clean, dry cloth.
  6. Apply silicone spray, wax, or other protectant. If using silicon or WD-40, wipe off excess with  soft, clean, dry cloth.

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#18 Chris J. Zahller

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 03:23 PM

I also needed new o-rings for my recent purchase. The Matthews o-rings are pretty dear. These are less expensive and better quality; if you are in the US you can get them from The O-Ring Store:

  • -318 S70 FDA Silicone (VMQ) 70 Duro O-Ring (S70318)

  • -314 S70 FDA Silicone (VMQ) 70 Duro O-Ring (S70314)

  • -312 S70 FDA Silicone (VMQ) 70 Duro O-Ring (S70312)

Note that the numbers (318, 314, 312) correspond to the Matthews part numbers. They are available in other materials but I chose silicone rubber for its durability and ability to withstand extremes temperatures and humidity.


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#19 JD Hartman

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 05:28 PM

You can get them and almost anything else mechanical, electrical, etc. from places like McMasterCarr or MSC.  Delivered to your door.


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#20 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 06:47 PM

How lucky you Americans are with McMasterCarr. I tried a while ago and got told they weren't taking any new customers in New Zealand. Of course they made an exception for some of the biggies in the composites industries here.  Still, it made me look around more. Always a good thing.

 

Any reasonable sized city will have someone selling O rings.


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