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Simon Wyss

Member Since 13 Sep 2008
Offline Last Active Today, 03:41 AM
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In Topic: Bolex viewfinder problem

Today, 03:38 AM

Who shoots in darker interiors?

 

In earnest, the Paillard-Bolex prism finder system is less bright than mirror systems.

You deal with about a fifth of the light compared to an Arriflex. It’s not a professional

camera. To overcome the focus problem in low light situations with Paillard-Bolex

you have a number of choices:

  1. Use a standard model that has the critical focusing prism behind the upper lens port. 100 % light on ground prism
  2. Find an Ambol Cine Focus accessory. Split-image lens coupled rangefinder, Switar 25
  3. Find a Bell & Howell focusing microscope that lets you focus a C-mount lens. 100 % light on ground glass
  4. Use a reflex finder zoom lens. Not much brighter than the RX finder however but split-image precision
  5. Find an Elgeet Cine-Flex 16 accessory and use a measuring tape
  6. Laserbrighten your RX camera
  7. Use very fast lenses. Maximum available with C mount is f/0.95 (Angénieux, Berthiot, Schneider,

    “Carl Meyer”, Zeika, Japan Navitar, Canon, Astroscope, Dallmeyer f/0.98)


In Topic: Image quality and sharpness comparison

12 January 2019 - 08:35 AM

It is but you obviously know the CP better than I do.

 

I’d like to bring in the subject of printing. We can discuss cameras and steadiness for ages, negatives are not projected. In the professional workflow theatre positives are made at some point and these, continuously exposed, will never contain the precision of which the original was located by the camera. You can have dimensionally stable polyester-base originals and polyester-base prints, the bringing together of original and raw stock on a printer makes the difference. I mean a difference for the spectators.

 

Now that film technics are almost forgotten about, thought of to belong in museums, intermittent contact printers in use have become still scarcer than they were thirty years ago. We’re in the field of 16mm film on this thread but I confess here that it makes me angry that 35mm productions have been worsened, strictly technically, in this respect. The film world didn’t fight the video menace by mechanically perfect prints and precision projectors. The latter are still the club foot of film cinema. To say nothing of second-class dupes


In Topic: Ye olde 144 degree shutter angle and lightmeter rant

12 January 2019 - 07:52 AM

Here’s a link to the other thread. http://www.cinematog...796#entry506168


In Topic: Ye olde 144 degree shutter angle and lightmeter rant

11 January 2019 - 03:13 AM

The Pentacon-8 shutter makes one third revolution per cycle, the pull-down takes a little more than 180 degrees of it. I’d like to come up with an English version of the article I’ve written on the cam. If I may ask for a little patience for a translation, had never thought that there is any interest in a GDR product.


In Topic: Ye olde 144 degree shutter angle and lightmeter rant

05 January 2019 - 04:58 PM

David, look, as I said, the instructions are from not before 1956 because the RX is treated in them. I think the booklet dates from 1960. There’s that code on the last page, something-06. Maybe, I don’t know Paillard’s secrets. Now, with the Reflex H-16 we have to include a light loss of between 20 and 25 percent at the prism block according to a lens’ design and that is compensated for by a shorter exposure time with the calculation. From 1/40 s to 1/60 s you have 33 percent decrease. Starting at a 1/45 s the shorter time compensates for 25 percent. 1/40 s is inaccurate.

 

Many instructions and manuals carry imprecise values and false things. Just of late have I studied the instructions to the Pentacon Pentaflex 8 camera. The exposure times in there are so crudely rounded that four different shutter angles derive from the values and none of them is even close to the truth, namely 172.8, 177.2, 184.3, and 192 degrees. The three openings are of a 50 degrees angle, so the true value is 150 degrees per cycle.

 

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Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Abel Cine