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"Follow" shot

steadicam handheld movi follow

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#1 hillary spera

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 11:42 PM

Hey all, 

 

I'm looking for examples of a "follow" type of shot -- in which the camera seems to stalk or hunt. Not so much a POV shot but instead something that follows a person as they move through a scene or landscape. Let me know if anything comes to mind! Most likely would be steadicam, but also looking into Movi or handheld. 

 

Thank you! 


Edited by hillary spera, 16 January 2017 - 11:43 PM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 12:19 AM

There are plenty of shots in movies where the camera is following someone's back through a space or landscape, some are long or short.  "The Evil Dead" is a good example of using a moving camera that seems to hunt or chase people down, sort of an evil spirit POV.  A comedic example is when the camera follows the band members around backstage in "Spinal Tap" when they get lost and can't find the stage.

 

"Tree of Life" has lots of moving shots cut into semi-montages, often following people.

 

A lot of movies begin a character introduction by following their backs through a space, such as in the early part of "The Hunt for Red October" when you meet the Russian minister who gets the letter from Marko Ramius.

 

Another example of sort of a "hunting" motion is in "The Conformist" (1970) when the killers chase Dominique Sanda through the snowy woods.

 

There is an interesting body cam rig in the opening of "Seconds" (1966) when a character follows John Randolph through the train station.


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#3 hillary spera

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 09:10 AM

Thanks so much, David. I really appreciate your help. Evil Dead and Tree of Life have both been examples we have looked at... they are great references. I love Seconds, thank you for reminding me of that incredible sequence in the beginning. I'll check out Hunt for Red October. 

 

Our camera wants to shadow the character even more... she hunts, so the idea is to mimic that concept in the way that it sees her move through a space and always stays with her. My biggest challenge now is to try and realize the best execution... I know it is best as steadicam (as we want the floating smoothness) but the organic intuition and intimacy of handheld is ideal, in theory. I am not considering a Movi as I don't think it is the best tool or workflow for us. We are intending to test the possibility of stabilizing a handheld shot, but I still am drawn to the objectivity of a camera on a steadicam. Perhaps it will end up being a combination of both. 


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#4 Dan Hasson

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 12:24 PM

David O'Russell (and the cinematographers who have worked with him) often use a steadicam that follows characters. His films are worth looking at for "follow" (steadicam) shots.


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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 12:34 PM

Not quite what you asked about, but look at the scene in Paths of Glory where the camera follows Dax and Broulard up the château staircase and stops just an instant after they do, as if it's an eavesdropper who has been found out.

Kubrick is a master of motivated camera movement.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 17 January 2017 - 12:35 PM.

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#6 Frank Hegyi

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 10:56 PM

I've always loved the shots in the The Wrestler where the camera follows the main character out into ring.


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#7 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 12:03 AM

classics .. opening shot.. Beyond the Pines.. all hand held..  the other steadicam.. Goodfella,s.. following into the night club..


Edited by Robin R Probyn, 18 January 2017 - 12:04 AM.

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#8 Albion Hockney

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 12:16 AM

I think the feeling of "stalking" or "hunting" comes from seeing someone at a distance often having them obscured a little. Might not be right for your project but I'd consider a steadicam on a longer lens (70-100mm) or even a much longer lens panning/tracking the subject on sticks or handheld ...maybe easy rig. 


Edited by Albion Hockney, 18 January 2017 - 12:18 AM.

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#9 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 03:33 AM

ah right yes.. didnt read the OP post very well .. ignore my examples.. they are not stalking or hunting type shots..!   agree with above..


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#10 hillary spera

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 08:31 AM

Thanks so much everyone! 


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#11 Reggie A Brown

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 12:49 AM

I think the movie Tremors and Jaws have the type of shots you're describing. Horror movies generally do those types of shots. The originally Halloween has a "stalking" steadicam shot in the opening.
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#12 Dan Hasson

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 01:20 PM

Rear Window! Although I guess that's more panning or tilting with a tripod rather than following (steadi or handheld). 


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