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Tri-X as a negative

7266

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#1 Jarin Blaschke

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 01:02 AM

I'm about to test this in a couple weeks, but in the meantime, does anyone have any anecdotes (or images!) regarding how, when processed as a negative, Tri-X 7266 looks compared to Double-X? I'm desperately grasping for a way to shoot true black and white film, while avoiding the mush that is Double-X.

 

Thanks.

 

-Jarin


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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 02:52 AM

Try ORWO UN 54. http://www.orwona.co...tography-films/


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#3 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 07:16 PM

Tri-X cross proceses ver well a negative and has a much smoother grain pattern compared to 7222


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#4 Michael Carter

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 07:33 PM

Reversal first developed grains are rougher than the second developed ones. Anyway, double X is made to print onto higher contrast stock to make the positives.

Edited by Michael Carter, 20 January 2018 - 07:35 PM.

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#5 Samuel Berger

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 10:36 PM

Tri-X cross proceses ver well a negative and has a much smoother grain pattern compared to 7222

 

Does Cinelab process Fomapan?


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#6 Simon Wyss

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 02:01 AM

Why shouldn’t they? Fomapan is the trade name of several black-and-white negative stocks.

If you mean Fomapan R, R for reversal, then things look different.


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#7 Samuel Berger

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 02:17 AM

Why shouldn’t they? Fomapan is the trade name of several black-and-white negative stocks.

If you mean Fomapan R, R for reversal, then things look different.

 

Why, yes! That is exactly what I mean and I should have said it. Thinking of getting some for the Filmo 70-DR.


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#8 Simon Wyss

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 04:06 AM

Well, it took my about four seconds for this:

 

Cinelab can develop 16mm, Super 16mm, and Ultra 16mm Color and Black and White Negative Films. We are also one of the very few laboratories in the United States doing daily processing of BW Reversal.

 

http://www.cinelab.com/16mm.html


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#9 Samuel Berger

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 12:48 PM

Well, it took my about four seconds for this:

 

Cinelab can develop 16mm, Super 16mm, and Ultra 16mm Color and Black and White Negative Films. We are also one of the very few laboratories in the United States doing daily processing of BW Reversal.

 

http://www.cinelab.com/16mm.html

 

Yes, but it didn't specify which ones. I'm not aware of which process Fomapan R requires, or if the one used by Cinelab is  the best one for this stock.


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#10 Mark Dunn

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 12:54 PM

 

Yes, but it didn't specify which ones. I'm not aware of which process Fomapan R requires, or if the one used by Cinelab is  the best one for this stock.

You can process literally any b/w film, neg or reversal, in the same developer and get an image. Reversal involves a couple of extra steps.

So if a lab says it processes b/w, it processes any b/w. There are differences between developers, but now that no-one is developing for print or projection anymore, they have less influence on the final images than they used to.


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#11 Samuel Berger

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 01:02 PM

You can process literally any b/w film, neg or reversal, in the same developer and get an image. Reversal involves a couple of extra steps.

So if a lab says it processes b/w, it processes any b/w. There are differences between developers, but now that no-one is developing for print or projection anymore, they have less influence on the final images than they used to.

 

Thanks, Mark


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#12 Michael Carter

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 04:46 PM

I print I project movies
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#13 Todd Pinder

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 07:48 PM

Well, it took my about four seconds for this:

 

Cinelab can develop 16mm, Super 16mm, and Ultra 16mm Color and Black and White Negative Films. We are also one of the very few laboratories in the United States doing daily processing of BW Reversal.

 

http://www.cinelab.com/16mm.html

 

 

 

Yes, but it didn't specify which ones. I'm not aware of which process Fomapan R requires, or if the one used by Cinelab is  the best one for this stock.

 

Its been discussed before that Fomapan uses different times than Tri X, and I cannot remember which lab, maybe Spectra, does special runs with Fomapan.


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#14 Samuel Berger

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 08:44 PM

 

Its been discussed before that Fomapan uses different times than Tri X, and I cannot remember which lab, maybe Spectra, does special runs with Fomapan.

 

I found what Robert from Cinelab posted a long time ago.

 

 

We develop allot of B&W Reversal, more than any lab in the world.

 

20,000ft in a day at times.

 

Foma has a much softer emulsion than Tri-X does, if you run it in the same time/temp as Tri-X the emulsion cooks off.

 

Spectra has called us in the past to ask how to deal with bleach issues, there is not a "Special mastery" of developing this stock.

 

Foma has to be run in special batches because the emulsion is not hard like Kodak or Orwo.

 

I see that dr5 charges $135 to develop an 100 ft roll of 16mm Foma, seems a bit expensive.

 

YMMV


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#15 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 09:40 PM

We develop Fomapan.

 

We have a dedicated Treise 8mm/16mm B&W Reversal processor and a Allen 16mm/35mm processor with developer tanks for B&W Negative and B&W Print.

 

We run FomapanR in batches as it comes in compared to Tri-x which is a daily run.


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#16 Samuel Berger

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 10:10 PM

We develop Fomapan.

 

We have a dedicated Treise 8mm/16mm B&W Reversal processor and a Allen 16mm/35mm processor with developer tanks for B&W Negative and B&W Print.

 

We run FomapanR in batches as it comes in compared to Tri-x which is a daily run.

 

Thank you, Robert. How much Fomapan constitutes a batch? What's the average turnaround? Ever since I saw this stock I can't wait to use some.


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#17 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 12:01 AM

We charge $17/roll and turnaround can be 3-4 weeks when we are busy with allot of Tri-X


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#18 Todd Pinder

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 12:54 AM

We develop Fomapan.

 

We have a dedicated Treise 8mm/16mm B&W Reversal processor and a Allen 16mm/35mm processor with developer tanks for B&W Negative and B&W Print.

 

We run FomapanR in batches as it comes in compared to Tri-x which is a daily run.

 

Robert, Are you guys only developing as a negative? No B&W reversal?


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#19 Mark Dunn

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 05:06 AM

 

Robert, Are you guys only developing as a negative? No B&W reversal?

Robert Houllahan, on 22 Jan 2018 - 02:40 AM, said:snapback.png

 

 

We have a dedicated Treise 8mm/16mm B&W Reversal processor


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#20 Chris Burke

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 06:55 AM

Rob,

 

I have a 400' roll of 7265 that I am itching to shoot. What would be the benefits/differences if I were to process as negative?


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