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16 mm negative color process


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#1 Fernando Alves

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 08:24 PM

Hello,

 

I want to know if is possible to process 16 mm color negative in a small lab? Last week I  have tryed to process some B&W super 8 reversal film and it worked.

 

I use a Lomo tank to do it. And now I want to make some experiments with 16 mm color negative. Can process some 16 mm expired film in a Lomo Tank? And if it is possible, how is the better way to do it?

 

Thanks a lot

 
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 08:34 PM

Color negative motion picture stock has a "remjet" carbon coating for anti-halation / anti-static purposes that has to be removed before development.


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#3 Fernando Alves

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 08:47 PM

Hi David,

 

Thanks for answer me back. So Should I "remjet" as a first step of the porcess?

 

Thanks a lot.


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 09:54 PM

See:

 

Yes, it's the first step before actual processing, otherwise you get a mess of black carbon in your developer.


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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 05:15 AM

You may be aware of this, but I'd add that as the colour process is much hotter, going straight from 39C to cold water may reticulate the film. Bring the temperature down gradually with intermediate rinses of progressively cooler water.

Edit: in Brazil your tap water may be warm enough anyway!


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#6 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 11:10 PM

Just go ahead and process the film with all the correct times and temps and steps, and remove the rem-jet coating after processing.   It's quite easy to do, using a bowl or large photo print tray, with a water bath the same temp as processing having added Borax to help remove the rem-jet backing.  At least 2 tablespoons per Liter of Water as a minimum, if stubborn, double the amount.  Run the film a foot or two through a soft photo grade sponge soaked with the solution, rinse often in clean water and keep repeating.  A 100ft(30.5m) spool of film will take you about 10-15 minutes on average.  Once washed again for just a couple minutes, use a Final Rinse solution for good film.  For such old film just for experimenting, a Film Wetting/Drying agent such as Kodak's Photo Flo is fine to allow even drying.   Afterwards when you have time, Filter your chemistry thru some cheesecloth to get any traces of the rem-jet out of the solution.  You could use some finer filtration if available, but some types will filter very slowly.  I filter clean each solution just to make sure there isn't any carryover into them all.  Have done this for several decades and works fine, doesn't harm the chemistry.  Good luck!


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