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white walls and a big window


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#1 Matteo Cocco

Matteo Cocco
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Posted 22 November 2007 - 08:41 AM

hi guys!
i´m shooting quite soon a short movie on 16mm and i´m quite worried on how to deal with one of the major location .
it´s a living room with almost no furniture (there will be just a bed and a small table), all the walls are white and there is a big window with balcony.
there will be shots where we see both in and inside, both day and night.
i don´t really know how to deal with white walls without letting them be "too white", and how to achive a good lighting continuity.
i´m looking forward for any suggestion!
thanks a lot
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#2 Matt Read

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 01:49 PM

If you can, paint the walls a different color. That's going to be your best bet and make your life a lot easier. If you can't paint them, put some colored poster board on the walls with staples or sticky tack.

If you're dead-set on having a white room, try to avoid aiming any lights directly at the walls. Bounce them off the ceiling to create ambiance. Or aim a light almost parallel to the wall, that way the intensity of the light on the wall near the light and far from the light will be significantly different.

You might consider using a china ball to light your actors. Hold it just off frame. That should light the actors well, but no spill too much and too intense light on the walls.

As for seeing both inside and outside of the room at the same time during the day, put some ND gel on the outside of the window. How much depends on how bright it is inside and outside. Just get some ND3 and you can double or triple it up as needed. Make sure you get enough to cover the window several times. For night, you'll probably have to light the outside a bit, unless there is a porch light or street light nearby. If you don't really need to see what's happening outside, you could close the window's curtains or blinds or just let it blow out, while at night you could let it be dark.

Best of luck.

Matt Read
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Visual Products

The Slider

Willys Widgets

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