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Super-8 total costs in 2018


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#61 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 05:54 PM

Must admit I've only skimmed this thread but are we seriously discussing scanning Super-8 to 4K DPX?

 Do it all them time.

 

You gain some detail especially in resolving the grain, and for shows which are originated in 4K it is a requirement to scan the film in 4K.


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#62 Nick Collingwood

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 06:51 PM

You've been missing out! Granted I don't scan my stuff to 4K but I do get everything scanned at 2K. To be honest, I found the difference between 4k and 2k negligible BUT the difference between 1080p telecine and 2K scans was incredible. So much sharper and better color. Super 8 shot well and scanned to 2K+ can blow older 16mm scans out of the water.

 

Must admit I've only skimmed this thread but are we seriously discussing scanning Super-8 to 4K DPX?


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#63 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 03:35 AM

2000 pixels wide from a mere 5.6mm of film frames.

 

Kodachrome 35mm slides were long imagined as being scannable to max  2000x3000 RGB pixels (not camera pixels)

Now it is supposed to be 8000x12000?


Edited by Andries Molenaar, 26 June 2018 - 03:35 AM.

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#64 Will Montgomery

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 09:51 AM

 Do it all them time.

 

You gain some detail especially in resolving the grain, and for shows which are originated in 4K it is a requirement to scan the film in 4K.

I agree with Robert...even when finishing to HD, a 4k scan of Super 8 makes a subtle but noticeable difference. Of course it helps when it is shot on a decent camera and actually in focus which doesn't happen very much with Super 8.

 

It's nice to have the extra resolution to make pan & scan and zoom decisions. You can reframe in post easily without loss of quality.

 

4k (and 5k) scan rates have come down dramatically recently...I guess because the ScanStation machines have proliferated.


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#65 Nick Collingwood

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 10:00 AM

2000 pixels wide from a mere 5.6mm of film frames.

 

Here's a frame from a wedding I shot last summer that I've shared before. Shot on Canon 814XL-S and scanned at 2K by Gamma Ray Digital on their ScanStation. It has been color corrected but no sharpening or denoise. Click for full res as this forum doesn't seem to auto-resize large images.

 

It's quite sharp if I say so myself and has a lot of detail even for something shot handheld at a long focal length. Technological advancements in imaging sensors have actually had quite the positive benefit for Super 8, showing what the format is truly capable of vs the low quality telecines we've all been used to for decades (let alone the silly framerate issues a la Wonder Years intro).

 

yGX9c5x.jpg


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#66 Will Montgomery

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 10:20 AM

Is this Vision 3 50D? Looks great and closeups are definitely the way to go with Super 8.

 

 

 

Here's a frame from a wedding I shot last summer that I've shared before. Shot on Canon 814XL-S and scanned at 2K by Gamma Ray Digital on their ScanStation. It has been color corrected but no sharpening or denoise. Click for full res as this forum doesn't seem to auto-resize large images. It's quite sharp if I say so myself and has a lot of detail even for something shot handheld at a long focal length. Technological advancements in imaging sensors have actually had quite the positive benefit for Super 8, showing what the format is truly capable of vs the low quality telecines we've all been used to for decades (let alone the silly framerate issues a la Wonder Years intro).

 

yGX9c5x.jpg


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#67 Nick Collingwood

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 11:00 AM

Is this Vision 3 50D? Looks great and closeups are definitely the way to go with Super 8.

 

Yup! 50D is pretty remarkable in Super 8. It kinda blew me away when I got my first 2K scans of 50D. It's so sharp and grainless for Super 8. This is the full video with most of the outdoor shots being 50D and some 200T.


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#68 Bengt Freden

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Posted 14 August 2018 - 04:21 PM

Ektachrome 100D Reversal is actually returning now it seems!

Kodak now officially announces it, and several filmmakers are in fact testing out the new emulsion this summer (you can see this if you look at facebook: https://www.facebook...ps/27648968851/ ). Super-8 (7294) will probably (finally!) be available on the market later this year, maybe in late December (in time for Xmas?).
Later still, it will supposedly also be available in 16mm 100 ft daylight and 400 ft core rolls:  https://www.kodak.co...ome/default.htm

And, as a 35mm stills film (135 format). I am hoping it could also be cut as a 120 roll film, for medium format cameras (Hasselblad, Mamiya, Bronica, Fuji, Rolleiflex, etc), which I use a lot (now with Fuji PROVIA 100F III, 100 ISO).

 

With this reversal film, things look a little bit better for Super-8 (and 16mm) - at least for the hobbyist or DIY/ 'Indie' film maker.

Bengt Fredén, photographer, Stockholm, Sweden


Edited by Bengt Freden, 14 August 2018 - 04:25 PM.

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#69 John Salim

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Posted 14 August 2018 - 05:01 PM

Ektachrome 100D Reversal is actually returning now it seems!

 

.....And, as a 35mm stills film (135 format). I am hoping it could also be cut as a 120 roll film, for medium format cameras (Hasselblad, Mamiya, Bronica, Fuji, Rolleiflex, etc), which I use a lot (now with Fuji PROVIA 100F III, 100 ISO).

 

 

 

Kodak have said they're only coating on one base thickness ( for super 8, 16mm and 35mm ) so won't be producing 120 ( thinner ) or 5"x4" ( thicker ) based films.

 

John S  :mellow:


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#70 Bengt Freden

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Posted 14 August 2018 - 05:21 PM

OK, John,

I guess that was pushing my luck! I hope that Fujifilm will continue producing just that, FILM, for some time to come, at least the PROVIA 100F film I am using. I've also heard that they will re-introduce their black & white ACROS film, which they recently discontinued, due to popular demand the world over.

Best, Bengt F, Sweden


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#71 David Peterson

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Posted 14 August 2018 - 10:42 PM

When I got into super8 I looked into getting more out of film, more resolution, but 16mm cameras back then were still quite expensive, I could shoot quite a few short films to completion for the price of one camera. There were cheaper cameras, but the super8 cameras had comparatively better lenses, and, if super8 is exposed well, shot on a tripod, and transferred well, it is simply stunning on the smaller screen.
And when you think about it, big screen film making is no longer the ultimate goal for film makers, the small screen, ie computer monitor, seems to be the exhibition medium for the future, so 35mm or 16mm resolution is no longer the most sought after originating format for small screen. Modern transfer facilities are finally capturing the magic that a projectionist See's, and modern affordable software is assisting the amateur film maker to do high quality post work.
Super8 enables the film maker huge amounts of freedom, to take a shot, and keep moving, chuck in a cart and keep shooting, no reliance on a big crew with all the inherent delays.
As always, the small formats are showing the way back to where film making started, creativity without being constrained by staffing issues, producers, budgets, lighting, set design, talent releases, focus pullers, boom operators, dolly warmers, wheel greasers, electrical cord straighteners, and catering.
Point, shoot, print, enjoy.


If you want that, you can also just grab a DSLR and shoot as well in a similar small crew / low impact manner. 


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#72 Jon O'Brien

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Posted 15 August 2018 - 03:47 AM

I'm so looking forward to Ektachrome coming back, mainly in my case for 16mm. I shot a wedding last weekend on Super 8, two rolls of 50D, on a Canon 1014 xl-s. First time I'd used this camera since about 1982. It still worked!! (well as far as I know). When I pulled out the second reel there was some lint in the corner of the film gate even though I carefully checked and cleaned gate and compartment before filming started. We will wait and see what the results come out like. There was no opportunity to do a test before the wedding, so results were accepted as being a risk. Word seems to be getting around that I'm back behind a camera, after a few decades away - I have been asked to help film a conference later this year.


Edited by Jon O'Brien, 15 August 2018 - 03:49 AM.

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#73 Nick Collingwood

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Posted 16 August 2018 - 10:03 AM

If you want that, you can also just grab a DSLR and shoot as well in a similar small crew / low impact manner. 

 

I mean .... ya but we're all here on a film forum for a reason. We like shooting film.

 

And new ways of optimizing quality and costs for budget filmmakers is always welcome. Plus it gets people used to shooting and handling film so if they decide to upgrade down the line to 16mm or 35mm, they know the basics already. And I'd honestly say Super 8 is way more forgiving of error than DSLR. If you miss focus in a DSLR shot, it's useless, but on Super 8, it doesn't have to be tack sharp to be usable footage.


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#74 Will Montgomery

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Posted 16 August 2018 - 11:49 AM

If you want that, you can also just grab a DSLR and shoot as well in a similar small crew / low impact manner. 

 

Sometimes making an impact with a Super 8 camera gives the bride & groom and extra "cool" factor that people remember. They love sending out Facebook posts showing the strange exotic camera used at their wedding. 

 

The other great thing to do with events like that is to handout cheap Super 8 cameras like the Canon AF310xl (that has a crappy lens but it is autofocus) to wedding party members so they can shoot for fun. Just give them one roll loaded and let them go to town and you'll get some great stuff to use that looks like Super 8 should...jerky and out-of-focus but when combined with the well shot stuff you do it is really cool. I have 15 of these camera I've purchased over the years for $5-$40 each so when a beer gets poured over them I really don't care.


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