Jump to content


Photo

Bolex Rex 5/SBM question


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 322 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:09 AM

On a Bolex Rex 5 and SBM, and apparently only on these models, there is a simple mechanical apparatus in the region of the loop-former lever, the purpose of which I don't understand. For instance, the Rex 4 has a different design at this point.

 

I'm pretty sure Rex 5/SBM Bolex users will know what I'm talking about. There is a sliding metal plate 2cm to the right of the loop-forming lever central button - the button you push to release the loop-formers after threading film. It has a slight lip that pokes up about 2mm, and you can push this plate left and right about 2mm. You can see it in this video, though the film loader never touches it or mentions it:

 

 

At 0:19, see the little black screw head to the right of the loop-former release button? To the right of that black screw head is the tiny lip that you can push left or right. It makes a slight click sound as you push it, and is clearly designed to be pushed. But what for?

 

I've looked at various loading videos and no one mentions it. Can anyone tell me what this sliding plate thing does, and whether I should push it to the left or to the right when loading the camera. I regret, but Bolex camera loading is, so far, not my forte. As mentioned above, the sliding plate is tightened by a black anodised screw approx. 4mm in width. The little plate bifurcates into two little prongs that seem to engage in some fashion with the loop forming mechanism. Any wisdom that anyone can impart on this mystery? As always, thank you.

 

 


  • 0

#2 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 322 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:33 AM

One more question, Bolex users!

 

This one may seem infuriatingly obvious, but bear with me - I'm trying not to ruin my first roll.

 

I can load a roll of 50D in subdued light, as in, enough light to see what I'm doing? Correct? Thanks for any advice.


  • 0

#3 Samuel Berger

Samuel Berger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 663 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Seattle

Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:37 AM

Are you talking about the audible click selector? Or the spool ejector? Maybe if you upload a picture with something pointing to what you mean we can help.


  • 0

#4 Samuel Berger

Samuel Berger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 663 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Seattle

Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:40 AM

One more question, Bolex users!

 

This one may seem infuriatingly obvious, but bear with me - I'm trying not to ruin my first roll.

 

I can load a roll of 50D in subdued light, as in, enough light to see what I'm doing? Correct? Thanks for any advice.

 

If it's in a daylight spool, sure. Just make sure to keep it tight around the spool because if it unravels, you'll waste a lot of the film.


  • 0

#5 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 322 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:45 AM

It's neither of those things, but thank you for mentioning - I was trying to figure out how to turn off the audible click and just figured it out.


  • 0

#6 Dom Jaeger

Dom Jaeger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1605 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 17 October 2017 - 06:14 AM

That lever lets you lock the two sprung sprocket guides open.
  • 0

#7 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1416 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 17 October 2017 - 08:21 AM

That lever lets you lock the two sprung sprocket guides open for inserting the film loop from a mag. You have a model with magazine saddle.

 

Else, you do the same mistake as many others, unfortunately it was given to the world by Paillard.

 

Don’t put the full spool on the spindle first but keep it in your hand, holding the film down with little finger. Pull a few inches for making the diagonal cut. Present the film to the running mechanism very shortly, so that it just holds on the first sprocket drum, stop mechanism. Now place full spool down, tighten the film lightly, and release mechanism again to complete threading. Once film leaves second drum, stop mechanism. Open loop formers, restart mechanism, check for good transport, run about a foot of film, stop. Attach film to empty spool, put spool down, hand wind up slack film, and run for another second to check whether film is taken up. Replace lid

 

Be so kind to your camera to not let it dangle around on a hard surface. Place it on your legs when sitting or crouching, the lenses pointing away from you. That is a good position. Reason for crouching? Everything falling will not fall far. Out in the wilderness you rather want a dusty cover lid than one with bent dogs.


Edited by Simon Wyss, 17 October 2017 - 08:28 AM.

  • 0

#8 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 322 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 17 October 2017 - 06:21 PM

Those bent dogs sound scary, I will avoid those!  :o  :)

 

Thanks Simon and Dom.

 

Could you describe in some more detail what you mean by springing open the sprocket guides? When I push this to the left and to the right, about 2 or 3mm of travel, absolutely nothing seems to happen to the mechanism. Nothing locks or springs open or closed. In case there is any confusion, I'm not talking about the lever that swings down to close down the loop formers.

 

If we are talking about the same thing, should the "lever" (I wouldn't call it a lever, I'd call it a sliding metal piece that is held down by a black anodised screw) be pushed to the left or to the right before threading the film into the top sprocket wheel? Thank you! Sorry, I'm not too mechanically savvy in some ways.


  • 0

#9 Dom Jaeger

Dom Jaeger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1605 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 17 October 2017 - 06:57 PM

Try pinching the two chrome knobs together that are next to the sprockets, so that the guides open. Then push that lever towards the gate to lock them open.
  • 0

#10 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 322 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 17 October 2017 - 09:06 PM

Ah-ha! Eureka. I see now Dom and Simon what you are saying. Thanks!

 

Simon, I didn't read carefully enough what you wrote, until just now. So this sprocket guide lock (the bifurcated sliding lever) is only used when using the 400 ft magazine? I can't figure out how on earth why, but will leave that query for another day.

 

So in a nutshell, to quote Austin Powers, I don't need to touch this lever lock at all if using 100 ft daylight spools - I just leave the two sprung sprocket guides unlocked and in the far right hand position and thread the film the standard way?


  • 0

#11 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1416 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 18 October 2017 - 12:53 AM

Jon, you should learn to read more slowly, more carefully, I have written for inserting the film loop from a mag.

Your loving mentor.


  • 0

#12 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 322 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 18 October 2017 - 01:00 AM

Ah-ha yes, the penny has dropped, now I understand. Thank you Simon.

 

It is for threading the LOOP straight through, as if loading a Panaflex or something like that. I get it. Thank you, mon amie.


  • 0

#13 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1416 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 18 October 2017 - 01:34 AM

Mon ami, male. Amie is female, the e at the end makes the difference.

French from Brisbane, how comes?


  • 0

#14 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 322 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 18 October 2017 - 01:38 AM

Sorry! My mistake. I typed "my friend" into a French translator and that is what came out. Merely a faux pas on my part. I'm not French and indeed of Irish stock mostly. You coming from Europe, and far away from Australia, I had a mental image of Hercule Poirot for some reason, and typed that welcoming phrase without giving it much thought. It was not meant to be offensive or to be humour at your expense, or indeed anyone else's. You see, like anyone else, Australians can put their foot in it, so to speak, when writing!


Edited by Jon O'Brien, 18 October 2017 - 01:43 AM.

  • 0

#15 Doug Palmer

Doug Palmer
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 303 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 18 October 2017 - 03:47 AM

Simon's loading method sounds good... haven't tried before beginning it prior to attaching the spool, I'll see if that works for me. 

I usually turn the speed down to say 16 or 12 fps when loading.


  • 0

#16 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1416 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 18 October 2017 - 04:19 AM

I usually turn the speed down to say 16 or 12 fps when loading.

 

That’s a good idea because not all cuts are perfect from the built-in cutter, you see, the distance from the edge to the first hole.


  • 0


rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

CineTape

CineLab

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Opal