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Help replace bulb connector Super 8 Projector


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#1 Cecilia Danell

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 04:25 PM

Hi,

I have been given a Sankyo P-1600 Super 8 projector off a friend. The projector had never been used and was still in its original plastic wrapping when I received it, but due to having been stored in a garage for decades I think some dampness must have affected the ceramic bulb socket as the bulb wont light up, despite buying and trying out a replacement bulb.

 

I was told that the ceramic bulb sockets sometimes erode over time, as they're copper inside, and I got hold of a replacement connector part by someone who works with Super 8 equipment. He told me to change out the old connector. I don't know much about electronics and am terrified of doing anything wrong and blowing up the bulb, projector or both, so here's to my question:

 

I was in a DIY shop the other day and picked up a pack of strip connectors for connecting up the wires for the replacement bulb socket once I've cut off the existing one. However, I didn't realise they come in different amperage. I randomly picked up 5-10 amp connectors, will these do or do I need higher amperage ones? I can't seem to find out what amperage the projector is, it just says it takes a 12V/100W lamp and has a 240V power supply. 

 

Is the amperage likely to be higher than 10 amp and if so, what will happen if I connect the bulb socket using a strip connector that has an amperage that's too low, will the projector blow up?

 

Any info on this would be much appreciated as I don't know much about electrics (as you can probably gather from my post) ;) 

 

 

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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 04:28 AM

Amps = watts/volts so the 100W bulb draws a bit over 8A at 12V. It'll be fine.

Be aware that that sort of connector isn't heat resistant so get it as far away from the bulb as you can.

Watch out for short circuits and wrap the terminal block in electrical tape when you're finished, to help stop the wires working loose, but as you're only dealing with 12V it won't kill anyone.

BTW the film is captivating. Maybe I won't get rid of my Super-8 camera after all. Though I daresay the scan, cut and grade was pretty pricey.

You're refurbishing a projector- does that mean you've shot some reversal film, or had a print made from your neg?


Edited by Mark Dunn, 09 August 2017 - 04:32 AM.

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#3 Cecilia Danell

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 04:58 AM

Thanks so much for the info, exactly what I needed to know!

 

And thanks for your comment about the film, it was pricey enough, but fortunately it was made under an Arts Council project award, which covered film stock, HD scanning and restoration.

Yes and no, I'm not gonna make a positive print from this film shot on negative as it was entirely edited in FinalCut, so the raw film reels are unedited, but I'm gonna be running a super 8 animation class during the autumn and we will be working with direct animation (drawing on the film strip) and stop-motion animation, and as the class is an introduction to super 8 equipment, including how to operate a camera, projector and viewer, I need a projector for that. Also, I thought it would be more exciting for the participants to see their work projected than to just get a digital file. And I can project some previous reversal work I've done to show as examples to the class. I have a Eumig projector, but that's with my parents in Sweden and I'm based in Ireland, so when my friend gave me this projector, especially since it was never used (the power chord was in unbroken plastic packaging and the projector was still wrapped) I'd love to get it working as it's got no dust/wear apart from the faulty bulb socket. 

 

Ok, so here's a follow on question you/someone else might know about: My materials budget for the class doesn't cover shooting on Vision 3 negative stock and also making a positive print to project, so I'm looking at using reversal film. Unfortunately Ektachrome 100D wont be back by the time I run this class so I'm looking at the only reversal stock I can find on the market, Wittner Chrome 100D  I've been looking at some youtube samples and it looks average at best, very grainy and nothing like Ektachrome but I don't have much of a choice and as it's for a training class, not an art piece, I don't fancy spending loads on negative film and positive printing. However, it's an evening class in an arts centre, so we'll be shooting under fluorescent lights and Wittner is a daylight stock. I'm about to buy a blue 80A filter to put in front of the lens for indoor shooting, but then this brings down the film to 25 ASA, That's really low, will I get anything at all if we shoot under flourescent lights in a white room (it would be brighter than normal incandescent interior lights but still) or do I need extra lights? I'm assuming this will throw the internal light meter entirely, so I wont have a clue if I'm getting enough light unless I meter externally. Also, is the 80A filter to compensate for warm incandescent indoor lights only, and if so will the Kelvin on the fluorescent ones be so high that my film turns out with a blue tinge instead? Agh, I just wish there was a reversal Tungsten stock available!

 

Any help or suggestions much appreciated!  

Thanks! 


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#4 Cecilia Danell

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 05:01 AM

Sorry, that should say Wittner Chrome 200D!


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