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Sraiyanti Haricharan

Member Since 18 Nov 2015
Offline Last Active Aug 26 2016 03:42 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Is cinematograpfy these days too perfect?

19 August 2016 - 05:52 AM

 

Their own... to each their own...

Yea. I sent out the stupid "his own" thing before realising the ironic gender exclusiveness. 


In Topic: Is cinematograpfy these days too perfect?

18 August 2016 - 03:00 AM

I could even argue that some films can be made with absolutely no fixed story in mind beforehand and actually brought together by the director at the edit table. My argument would be stupid but I could argue that. 

 

For example, taking something like the documentary Leviathan into consideration, could it be said that most of the footage you see is directorial and/or cinematographic? Or would you say it's based on a solid storyline? 


In Topic: Is cinematograpfy these days too perfect?

18 August 2016 - 02:53 AM

While it's true, Tyler, that there's a whole new level of post production dependency, I do think that there are good, relatively fast, cheap, dps. In the indie film circuit alone you see sooo many films that clearly seem low budget but with good framing, composition and shots. 

 

If you had to choose between a good, cheap, relatively fast dp who would give you well composed, well lit digital images and a cheap, fast, not so great dp who just wants to get the job done and is of the "we'll just fix it in post" attitude, who would you pick? Obviously the more efficient one. This doesn't have to be a Lubezski. I honestly think a lot of the dp's work is just to make sure that the image can be the best it can be given the project constraints (and most projects that aren't of unbelievably epic proportions have them). I could be biased but to me, this seems crucial. Yes, your argument about post production being able to do wonders in today's age is valid to a large extent but I personally feel anyone who's doing their job well won't pass the buck on to the next person in line. 

 

I have seen footage of another dp's go from flourescent yellow because of bad white balancing to regular skin tones in post. If you're of the argument that time is money, what  then saves more time? Taking a few minutes to make sure you've got your white balance right? Or correcting each shot in the grading suite? And the argument that it's a given that a dp should know how to white balance isn't solid simply because there do exist those who don't.

 

And honestly a badly composed shot can have very little done to help it in post. Yes, I'm sure anyone can pick up a camera today and shoot a film. But there is something that differentiates visuals that evoke a certain emotion from visuals that just don't do anything for a story. And that, in my experience, comes mainly from the collaborative effort of the director/dp. I cannot even begin to think of a film working without a competent director. Frankly, you are only letting a story down by not caring enough about the visuals on set. 

 

My main point is still why would you not want competent crew members in every department? Especially when there are so many aspiring, talented cinematographers out there right now. It's not like there's a lack of them so why even think about hiring a below average dp? Just like you would want the best you can afford in every other department as well. And like David Mullen said, this argument could be made by singling out any other department in a film as well.

 

I could even argue that some films can be made with absolutely no fixed story in mind beforehand and actually brought together by the director at the edit table. My argument would be stupid but I could argue that. 


In Topic: Is cinematograpfy these days too perfect?

16 August 2016 - 03:12 AM

Either way, to each his own, yes. 

 

Or her own. :)


In Topic: Is cinematograpfy these days too perfect?

16 August 2016 - 03:11 AM

So it comes down to semantics then, I suppose. I think the confusion was that a lot of parallel points were addressed within the original argument. I don't think anyone is disagreeing with the fact that cinematography isn't synonymous with storytelling. That's not what made it seem like you're undermining the importance of cinematography. The other statements about lighting not changing much in terms of story was what we were hashing out. 

 

Either way, to each his own, yes. 


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New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

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Aerial Filmworks

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Visual Products

Tai Audio

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post