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A question for Nizo 801 users (slight issue)...


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#1 Rolando Morales

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 05:05 PM

Hello all!

 

So i'm shooting my third roll ever of Super 8 and second roll in my Nizo 801 (first roll was perfect). Then when I'm almost done with the roll of Kodak 50D, at the Beach today, I realized my aperture was on f1.8. Then thinking a little more I'm pretty sure it was there from the start of the roll. After some internet search and reading the manual I tested the voltage using the "black dot" power circuit (On/OFF switch). It went straight to f16, great. I tried checking the batteries for the meter and the aperture crept back to f1.8. ok. SO then I tried manually adjusting the aperture, and it barely made it's way to f4 and would go no more and this was pointing at a bright wall in full sun. 

 

Then I read a little about the "issues" with the batteries for the meter. I have never changed them since new, and from what I'm hoping for is that that may be the issue. I've also heard about "sticky shutters" but have no way to test that.

 

So I'm here asking anyone with this experience or similar what can I check aside from the new batteries I will be ordering. Also, should I even bother getting the 50D developed and scanned, being that it might be WAY over exposed? Or should I let Cinelab know and maybe they can get something going for it?

 

Any help and or suggestions is always appreciated. I tried a search but some things weren't to clear for me. Thanks to all in advance!


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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 06:28 PM

Were you shooting at the sun or really bright scenes?? I would say you should talk to the lab, but process and scan anyway. All Kodak stocks hold highlights very well. I did shoot a roll of the 03 in super 8, where I overexposed a great deal. How much?? not sure, but it looked all blown out with highlights extremely clipped. I was able to pull it all down in the grade to a very useable image. I would wager that you have not lost that roll. You can pull process, but like I said talk to Cinelab. 


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#3 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 04:03 AM

I have to disagree. On a sunny beach you should have been at f16 or smaller. There's "holding highlights well" and there's "6+ stops overexposed". At best the material will be very flat.

Unless you can ascertain that the indication was at fault, not the actual aperture, save your money.


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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 09:11 PM

With that camera, it has a 150 degree shutter, so maybe ƒ11, then there is light lose in camera, He could pull process. and the fact that a stop over is good ..........so he is not that much over at 1.8. I still wouldn't worry that much.  I didn't say a perfect image but usable.  But a the end of it all, it is super 8 and it will never be that a clean image.                        Until ektachrome comes back.

 

A question for Rolando. Was the shutter in the half way position at all? If so, it may help you. Puts you at approximately 1/115. Were you shooting at 24fps? What did Cinelab say?


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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 09:15 PM

Also you have to take into account the way film clips is very pretty. Not sure what you were going for or what your expectations were, but I still recommend going for it. 


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#6 Alessandro Malfatti

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 06:47 AM

I think it might be that it's just the lightmeter battery, and that the manual aperture adjustment depends on said battery. When you do the lightmeter battery test (using the aperture knob, not the power switch), the needle is supposed to go to f8, if it was at 1.8 like you wrote then clearly the lightmeter batteries are low, and most likely that's the reason why your aperture isn't working. Try the new lightmeter batteries, maybe it's as simple as that.

Here's a link to a user manual for the 801 http://imperfectcine...acro-Manual.pdf


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#7 Nick Collingwood

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 03:41 PM

Ya an unfortunately downside to this camera is that you CANNOT operate the aperture manually without the lightmeter batteries. It's silly. You SHOULD be able to manually expose without batteries but alas, that's not how they made it. So if your batteries are dead then it leaves the aperture wide open. Plus these batteries die pretty quickly if you leave them in the camera. Always remove them and re-tape the flat side to preserve them.
 
With that said, I'd still develop your film normally. I shot the below film on the sunny beaches in Savannah, GA with 500T exposed at 160 in my Nizo 801 actually (and I'd imagine it should've been even more stopped down than I could go, and it came out fine! I initially planned to reversal process the film which requires overexposure but decided not to). Vision3 has crazy highlight latitude so get a nice 2K scan and work on the color correction in post.
 
(enjoy my goofy VO)
 

 
 

I have to disagree. On a sunny beach you should have been at f16 or smaller. There's "holding highlights well" and there's "6+ stops overexposed". At best the material will be very flat.
Unless you can ascertain that the indication was at fault, not the actual aperture, save your money.

 
I'd disagree with your disagreement. I'm no expert but it has been shown that film holds highlight exceptionally well. Just take a look at this image. Granted it's Portra 400 but it's similar and it just shows you 6+ stops isn't insane.


Edited by Nick Collingwood, 10 July 2018 - 03:50 PM.

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#8 Rolando Morales

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 08:09 AM

Thanks everyone! I have yet to send the film out. I have been testing other films I had in medium format. 

 

I will definitely send the film out soon as I have another roll that I plan to shoot. I have not contacted Cinelab yet, but will see their suggestion. Also, I was shooting at the "normal" 18 fps. The roll is not THAT important, just family footage. Well important to us =)

 

Will update soon.

 

Thanks again =)


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#9 Mark Dunn

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 09:11 AM


 
 

 
I'd disagree with your disagreement. I'm no expert but it has been shown that film holds highlight exceptionally well. Just take a look at this image. Granted it's Portra 400 but it's similar and it just shows you 6+ stops isn't insane.

Crumbs. If 50D behaves like that I agree with your disagreement. I used to use Portra all the time, but usually in the studio so never got to find out.


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