Jump to content



Photo

Kodak's New Super 8 Camera Update


  • Please log in to reply
67 replies to this topic

#61 David Scott

David Scott
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • Other
  • San Antonio

Posted 28 January 2018 - 04:15 PM

Is there some info somewhere to substantiate that Kodak was lying about this? I've heard the claim that it was toxic, but I've heard that of EVERY single photographic chemical since I first became interested in it in 7th grade, which was a LONG time before kodachrome was discontinued. Since I became re-interested in filmmaking 5-6 months ag, I've read every story I can find about kodachrome, Kodak, super 8 and filmmaking and all recite the toxic story, but I've had the suspicion all this time that the decision to kill kodachrome was probably more financially based and related to Kodak's bankruptcy. Not that the actual reason matters, to be honest, it's perfectly legal for a company to stop making a product whenever they choose.
  • 0

#62 Christopher Ian

Christopher Ian
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Other
  • Philadelphia, PA

Posted 28 January 2018 - 05:38 PM

I've given up on the new camera after hearing rumblings of a three thousand dollar price tag. I was all in when it was 600 bucks though!

 

Chris


  • 0

#63 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 574 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 28 January 2018 - 07:12 PM

Kodak should just bring it back and call it something else.


Edited by Jon O'Brien, 28 January 2018 - 07:14 PM.

  • 0

#64 Doug Palmer

Doug Palmer
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 382 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 29 January 2018 - 05:46 AM

I used to pick em up projectors all day long at the thrift stores for peanuts... the ones that run, a lot of times won't thread properly. I finally settled on a nice ElmoST-1200 that I put new belts in, been using for a decade. It works, but i still have to help rewind by hand. For the most part, there is no place where someone can take a film projector in for repair. You're talking about a few niche guys around the globe. I would pay $500 for a brand new reliable model. 

 

Kodachrome is not coming back as we know it because it can't. The process is too difficult and toxic, which is why it was replaced by E6. There was only one lab in the world was processing it when it died in 05. E6 Ektachrome will allow processing options all over, including at home. Bringing back an E6 has proved difficult enough, but it will happen and that's pretty amazing in itself. 

How many Kodachrome workers had health problems due to the chemicals ? 

It sounds to me a very convenient story.  It's a complicated process yes, but once set up and running it probably wouldn't cost more than say E6.  Remember, Kodachrome processing in those days was quite cheap.  And over here in UK we used to pay for it upfront so even cheaper.

Apart from the obvious attraction of seeing a Kodachrome image in one's hands again, and the many younger people who didn't know it too,  I would have thought there would be a demand for archiving film footage.  Much cheaper than doing black and white separation negatives. It was done of course for printing, but not sure if anyone in the past made archive copies of actual negatives on Kodachrome.

 

A 500$ projector ? I concede yes it would be a good idea.  Maybe not many folks would buy it initially, though a ready market for organisations involved in archiving super-8 film.  Also film workshops and so on.


Edited by Doug Palmer, 29 January 2018 - 05:55 AM.

  • 0

#65 Doug Palmer

Doug Palmer
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 382 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 29 January 2018 - 05:56 AM

Kodak should just bring it back and call it something else.

Definitely not !


  • 0

#66 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2844 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 29 January 2018 - 06:07 AM

How many Kodachrome workers had health problems due to the chemicals ? 

It sounds to me a very convenient story.  It's a complicated process yes, but once set up and running it probably wouldn't cost more than say E6.  Remember, Kodachrome processing in those days was quite cheap.  And over here in UK we used to pay for it upfront so even cheaper.

One wouldn't want anyone's health to suffer unnecessarily. It's only film.

However, that wasn't the reason IIRC- Kodak said that there were some new environmental requirements in the pipeline and that the small sales of Kodachrome didn't justify the expense of meeting them. Rather like the discontinuation of pre-striped film in the 90s- some new regulations were about to affect the stripe adhesive and sales of sound carts had fallen to such a low level- I believe Kodak quoted in the tens of thousands a year, down from tens of millions in Super-8's heyday- that it simply wasn't economic.
BTW Kodachrome was never cheap except in volume. Until the invention of the packaged chemicals and the minilab processor late in the day the process had to be monitored by an analytical chemist. That's why there were only ever a handful of labs in the world. E6 is a very different beast.
I'l assume you're aware of the difference between chromogenic and non-colour coupler integrated emulsions.

Edited by Mark Dunn, 29 January 2018 - 06:11 AM.

  • 0

#67 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1595 posts
  • Other
  • Near Basel, Switzerland

Posted 29 January 2018 - 10:37 AM

We must see what contributes to filmmaking. Magnetic stripes just worked on commercial prints, mass products. For the home enthusiasts every SEPMAG system was better and cheaper, tape recorders were available before someone began glueing magnetic tape on film. Kodak’s Ektasound system was one of a number of washouts or put more mildly, less successful projects. Fairchild’s Cinephonic died silently.

 

A have renewed my inquiry for a repair manual and spare parts with Kodak.


  • 0

#68 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2844 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 29 January 2018 - 10:48 AM

 

 

I have renewed my inquiry for a repair manual and spare parts with Kodak.

For what?


  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment