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Fuji Color Film


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#1 Richard Hackney

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 12:20 AM

I am wanting to shoot a film and cross process the stock.

Can you run fuji F-CP-3513DI, a color positive film, though a camera and get the same rsuslts as Kodak Ektachrome?

I have seen conflicting results.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 08:13 AM

I am wanting to shoot a film and cross process the stock.

Can you run fuji F-CP-3513DI, a color positive film, though a camera and get the same rsuslts as Kodak Ektachrome?

I have seen conflicting results.


No, not really. Color print film is actually a negative stock; I don't think the results of using it in the camera would be like cross-processed reversal. I have seen tests of making a print off of a negative and then using that as an IP to make a dupe negative off of that for a chrome-looking effect.
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#3 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 10:58 AM

I have seen tests of making a print off of a negative and then using that as an IP to make a dupe negative off of that for a chrome-looking effect.


I don't know why, but something with the way you worded that confuses me. You are saying that using print film as a camera negative and then going through the IP/dupe process will produce the chrome effect? Or have i misunderstood what you said?
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 07:32 PM

I don't know why, but something with the way you worded that confuses me. You are saying that using print film as a camera negative and then going through the IP/dupe process will produce the chrome effect? Or have i misunderstood what you said?


I think the process that was implied is

1 Shoot regualr neg

2) make a print,

3 use the print to make a High contrast duplicate negsatibve.

4 Use that to make your final print.

The lab (niagra custom lab in toronto) that hjas been running my experiments with colour neg, uses more or less this process to make the Leaders they splice on the negative rolls to make a work print. The contrast is VERY HIGH, althogh I can't say how it would work for colour... They are only using a black and white leader - I guess as making them this way is almost free for the lab when they use up short ends of print stock on days when they are not busy.


The Print stock is fairly insensitive - so it would probaly work at the ASA 0.5 to 5 range. AND be tungsten balanced for Low temperature lights. (Printers use a low voltage on a projector bulb to get steady output and long bulb life.)

The print stock also does not have a masking feature so the colours may change form hi-lights to shadows.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 11:21 AM

Make a print off of a negative.
Use that print as if it were an IP and strike an IN off of it.
Make a print off of the IN.
It looks rather like chrome photography.

FotoKem has a demo of this technique.
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