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Pronunication of the word "Arri"


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#1 Matthew McDermott

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 01:30 PM

Perhaps this rather silly and basic question has been asked before but I couldn't find reference to it in the archives.

How does one pronounce the word "Arri"? Is is <arr-eee>? Or <air-eee>? Since its a combination of Arnold and Richter, I've always assumed it should be said the first way but I've heard both spoken. I feel absolutely stupid asking this because I've used their equipment for a while and never gave a second thought to the way I was pronouncing the word until today when I was rudely corrected by someone.

Thanks in advance.
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#2 Patrick Neary

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 01:48 PM

Hi there-

I've never heard it pronounced "Ah-ree", but that has a bit more sophisticated ring to it than the nasal "air-ree". But then I always say "ah-ton" where everyone else I know says "ay-ton"!
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#3 Matthew McDermott

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 02:56 PM

Maybe I'm fooling myself and I am the only person that says it that way. I've always thought "air-eee" sound far too nasal to be the proper German pronunciation. It makes no linguistic sense to make the A-R letter combination into an AIR sound. Hopefully they're some German speakers out there that can correct me on this.

But then again I pronounce Aaton "ah-ton" as well. I can't think of a single instance where a double-A makes an "Ay" sound in French.

Well I guess some people say "Jar-mooosh."
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#4 Filip Plesha

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 03:20 PM

Germans pronaunce it like Ah-(germar R = something like hr or ghr, similar to french R)-e or if you wan't it like you put it, it would be ah-ree
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#5 Matthew McDermott

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 03:31 PM

Thanks much everyone. I realize how you pronounce a word has little bearing upon your worth as a cinematographer but sometimes once something gets stuck in my head I've got to get to the end of it. Thanks again.
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 04:11 PM

Hi,

> "ay-ton"!

Sigh - Americans!

"Daddy, what's a rack?"
"It's a country."

Phil
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#7 Christian Appelt

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 06:17 PM

"ah-ree" is correct.

The names of Arnold and Richter are spoken with a hard "R", which is AFAIK not used in the English language at all.

The "A" in ARRI is pronounced similiar to the Scandinavian "å" , but short because of the following double-R. (Unless you come to Arri's hometown Munich where different Bavarian dialects are spoken, a local technician may speak of his "orrifleks" (with a strong "rolling" tongue-R). They say that Bavaria is to Germany what Texas is to the U.S. :)

Steenbeck, the company that makes the 16&35mm flatbed editing tables, is a German company like its competitor KEM, both are located in Northern Germany. The double-E in the company's name is pronounced correctly "stain-back" in German, but very often I have heard film students and young filmmakers talk about how they watched a print on a "stiinbeck" (like "steenbeck" in English, of course). They believed that sophisticated film equipment (except Arri cameras) had to come from the United States. On the other hand, they never heard of a Moviola and are generally surprised when you explain that most pre-1980s English language films were cut on this strange beast.

So never mind what's correct as long as people understand what you mean! :D
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#8 Dominic Case

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 07:31 PM

Arri in Australia is invariably with a short A as in Harry. Maybe that's because the first rental company to supply them was John Barry's. (to rhyme).

Aatons rhyme with Dolly Parton. Ayton? Like digibayta?

Steenbecks are usually pronounced with a long ee as in bean. I've not heard the authentic "Stainbeck" as Christian advises - but it's common to hear "Stinebeck" - probably not an attempt at the correct German pronunciation so much as a parallel with the piano maker (Steinway). Yes I know it's spelt differently.

Since they no longer make motion picture negative, this forum won't have an opinion on how to pronounce Gevaert, will it;-)
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#9 Patrick Neary

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Posted 03 August 2004 - 11:01 PM

...and don't even start with that french 16mm "Bow-Lew"!
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#10 Alvin Pingol

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Posted 04 August 2004 - 02:11 AM

Telecine


1) `teh-le - seen
2) `teh-le - sin - ee
3) `teh-le - sin - uh


I hear 1 and 2 most commonly, but if I'm not to be mistaken, the 'proper' pronunciation is the third. Is this correct?

I sort of mix 2 and 3, sort of a `teh-le - sin - eh pronunciation...
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#11 Michael Nash

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Posted 04 August 2004 - 04:37 AM

Ar -ree, as in Arnold. But everybody says air-ree.

Aa ton, like "hat."

Tell-a-sin-ee.
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#12 Sam Wells

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Posted 04 August 2004 - 10:02 AM

Aa ton, like "hat."

That's how I say it, but with ancient Egyptian, who can be sure ? :)

-Sam
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#13 Preston Herrick

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Posted 04 August 2004 - 10:04 AM

That's funny, I had always been told it was and had used AR-E.

Then one day I called the Arri U.S. office for something and asked the person at the other end if it was AR-E or AIR-E. She said, AIR-E. Po-tay-toe, Po-taa-toe?
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#14 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 04 August 2004 - 07:14 PM

I have a friend who always pronouces Aaton "Ah-TON". He pronouces it correctly but he emphasizes the last half of the word. I've always wanted to correct him, but figured he actually might be right, since I've never been given a definitive answer about it.
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#15 Dominic Case

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Posted 04 August 2004 - 10:17 PM

She said, AIR-E.

Is that to rhyme with Paris (the French way?)
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#16 Markus Rave

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Posted 05 August 2004 - 07:03 AM

ARRI is pronounced a-ree with a short a like the u spoken in but. The ee is held short like the i in it. The RR is not spoken as in English speaking countries but pronounced hard.

Markus
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#17 J. Lamar King

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 03:03 AM

Here in Texas I hear Air-ee quite often and I've even been corrected when saying Ah-ree. For some reason now I tend to split the difference and say Ah-ree for the company name and Airee-flex for the camera. Who knows...

Telecine is definitely pronounced tel-a-sin-ee. It happens to be in the dictionary with a bar over the E meaning it is a long E.

Heck, this is tough for us Americans. We're still tripping up over the Route/Rout thing. ;)
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#18 Filip Plesha

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 07:42 AM

Here in Texas I hear Air-ee quite often and I've even been corrected when saying Ah-ree. For some reason now I tend to split the difference and say Ah-ree for the company name and Airee-flex for the camera. Who knows...

Well there is no reason to doubt. It is Ah-ree.
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#19 Matt Pacini

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 01:23 PM

"... Sigh - Americans!
Phil



Oh, let's not start with this stuff again!

So far, the times I've heard anyone, from any other country go into an "American accent" to pronounce one of our names or words, has been exactly zero.


Matt Pacini
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#20 georg lamshöft

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 03:35 PM

Now I know the real reason why you are using Panavision-stuff... "I want to rent a airee" "A what?" "Okay, I take the panavsion as usual" :P

Look (or hear) at the Videos on arri.de ("what is arricam"), then you know the right pronounciation!

greetings from Berlin!
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