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$10,000 budget

no-budget short micro low

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#21 Richard Boddington

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Posted 25 August 2018 - 03:54 PM

Quite frankly, if I was making a student short for 10K I certainly would not bother incorporating a company, that would be a total waste.  You're not making an asset that will later be sold.   As for insurance, there must be a student package out there someplace? It pays to call around, as rates vary greatly.  But don't buy the gold star package.

 

I would focus on putting all of that money up on the screen, every penny.  If you are at a film school, I don't see why you would pay crew?  When I was at film school, everyone worked on everyone else's productions, and no one got paid.  The 10K should be used to buy things that will bring real value, to make your project stand-out.   If something costs $1000.00 try and get it for $300.00 under the....I am a starving film student on a super low budget, argument.  You'll be surprised what you can get if you ask nicely and at least offer a few bucks.

 

But focus on getting all that money up on screen, do not get bogged down paying for stuff the audience will never see.  

 

R,


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#22 Richard Boddington

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Posted 25 August 2018 - 04:01 PM

 

Thank you for that Ed, you made this student do a bit of research on production credits.

 

I've found a link which does list state production incentives here:http://www.filmprodu...xincentive.html

 

After perusing that link, I followed up with the good people in New Mexico: http://nmfilm.com/Summary_1.aspx

 

I had a wonderful conversation with their Incentive Controller, to whom I detailed my no-budget production.  She gave me examples of the incentives and detailed some of the expenses that would be eligible, including 25% for post-production, She assured me that there was "no minimum" for qualified productions, even giving me the example that if I spent $100 on a hard drive, I could be eligible to get $25 of that back if I only shot even for just a day. It was quite a sales pitch!

 

Ed, did you have some negative experience with New Mexico or some other state that I should be aware of? Because the information you've provided does not at all seem correct.

 

As for the above.....I'm afraid you need to do a lot more research my friend, state incentives are not for 10K short films.  Accessing these funds is not as easy as submitting a form and getting a cheque in the mail.  It's an extremely complex process that is a job for professionals.  It does say on their site that "student films" are allowed, but I would guess that zero 10K student films have been shot in NM, and then received the rebate.   The accounting and legal fees alone would eat up a huge chunk of that 10K and leave you with a negative.  It's really just not feasible.

 

Did you read the list of qualifying expenditures?  

http://www.nmfilm.co...penditures.aspx

 

R,


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#23 Uli Meyer

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 12:54 AM

Hire an experienced continuity person. Nothing worse to realize during editing that in one shot the gloves are off.


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#24 Phil Connolly

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 12:11 PM

Depending on what you attempt 10k should be able to go quite far on a student production.

 

As a student if your school is providing; equipment, insurance, studio space, other students to crew, post production facilities etc... Then you budget should be able to go quite far.

 

My grad film cost about £9k cash, but it would probably have cost about £100k if I was paying full whack for everything. The school provided studio space, some props, lighting, postproduction, kit, insurance.

 

In the end most of the budget when on cast and production design - we did a self build and it took quite a lot to furnish it. I ended up spending close to £1k on food for the 6 day shoot.

 

Most the crew were other students who were unpaid but I hired in a Make-up artist, Gaffer and 1st AD.  The time saved paying for a professional Gaffer and 1st AD was worth it- but as a student I was able to negotiate good rates.

 

The point of going to film school (esp if your paying 100k fee's) is to get as much stuff out of them as possible. 

 

I'm gearing up for a short film at the moment in the low budget bracket - my spending priorities are going to be: Actors, Sound recordist and production designer.  A short needs good actors, good sound and convincing set - get those things right and most other things can be fixed in post. Post can be very cheap if you throw a lot of time at it...


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#25 Grant Perkins

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Posted 28 August 2018 - 03:04 AM

 

The point of going to film school (esp if your paying 100k fee's) is to get as much stuff out of them as possible. 

 

 

Man oh man you couldn't be more correct -- definately worthy of another thread!

 

I wasted my time and money at film school not going with the attitude that I was basically buying a "gym membership" at a movie studio. What's worse, is that it was overseas, so I didn't have the connections with the school to get a gig out of there and my classmates were scattered worldwide so I couldn't hook up with them to put together out first projects, networking, etc.


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#26 Phil Connolly

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Posted 29 August 2018 - 10:30 AM

What's worse, is that it was overseas, so I didn't have the connections with the school to get a gig out of there and my classmates were scattered worldwide so I couldn't hook up with them to put together out first projects, networking, etc.

Thats a big shame - the most useful thing about my film school experience was getting a team of collaborators to work with. 9 years later, I still use a lot of film school contacts. Its not the only way to find collaborators of course, but its a good kick starter. 


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#27 Jaap Ruurd Feitsma

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Posted 01 December 2018 - 01:59 PM

If you want your film to be seen, use part of the budget to market your film. Think social media, newspapers, etc. But also think film posters and getting your film into film festivals. A 10K budget can make a very nice short film. It starts with story. The story better be great! :) And if it is, it would be shame if many people wouldn’t be able to see it. Sure, you can post it online, but getting as much publicity for your film will help you in your future career for sure.


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