Jump to content


Bruce Greene

Member Since 07 Feb 2005
Offline Last Active Today, 05:38 PM
-----

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Not sure where exactly to ask this...

Yesterday, 04:42 PM

Do not use a dead cat with a child under any circumstances!!!!

There are some realistic toy cats for sale if you search for them.
Get one and remove most of the stuffing and refill with something heavier like sand so it will be floppy. Restitch the cat. It should look very real.

In Topic: Setting up S-Log on Sony A7lll?

13 January 2019 - 08:00 PM

Hi Bruce, Henry Cline here. The thing I cannot understand is that while in s-Log the ISO in the viewfinder just says AUTO ISO cant change the ISO because an error message comes up that says unable due to Gamma S-Log configuration. So, I am just trying to understand better what exactly it is set at? Confusing for sure. I greatly appreciate your input and hope you are well.

 

Henry

Hi Henry, all is well, thanks!

 

Is this issue not discussed in the user manual?  Perhaps your issue is related to your choice of "picture profile"?


In Topic: Setting up S-Log on Sony A7lll?

13 January 2019 - 04:20 PM

I've only used the A7RII in sLog.  If I recall, on this model the ISO minimum is 800 and can not be set lower than that.  It might even have been fixed at 800, but I can't remember.  It was not "auto ISO".  On the A7III it might have a minimum setting of ISO 1600.

 

My experience was that in camera recording in sLog did not make good images, with substantial compression blocks in the darker parts of the image.  Recording to ProRes on an external recorder solved this issue, even though the recording was still only 8 bits over the HDMI.

 

I do strongly suggest not recording in camera in sLog without proper testing first.


In Topic: financing an expensive camera package; risky?

13 January 2019 - 04:06 PM

If you can project on-going income to be able to cover the loan payments, this could be a sensible thing to do.  Keep in mind that this sort of financing may be a bit more expensive than a bank loan.  It would be best to explore multiple funding sources before committing.  And read the contract very carefully.

 

I've also purchased cameras without the certainty of paying for the camera through rental income from the camera.  As such, I treated this purchase as a marketing expense (though not for taxes!).  In the end I recouped only 25% of the cost of the camera through rentals.  As a marketing strategy (and educational strategy) it was very successful.

 

The company you referenced seems to specialize in leasing as opposed to lending.  Please be sure to understand what this means and costs you.  If I recall, these agreements often require substantial periodic reporting about your business which you may find to be quite time consuming.  In addition, they are usually more expensive than a bank loan, but easier to obtain.  In my case, I was able to obtain bank loans, but it was not easy to find a willing bank, and I needed to present a good business plan and make a good pitch:)  The beauty of the bank loan was that the only collateral was the camera itself, and not my home or other assets.  And, they didn't even know what the camera looked like and never even asked to see it.  They were just convinced that it was a good risk for them and they trusted my personality and credit history.  I think the rate was Prime + 1%, 5 year term.  A lease to own agreement might make figuring out the actual loan% more difficult, so beware.


In Topic: Native ISO & Metering

11 January 2019 - 01:06 PM

The difficulty of being a novice light meter user and testing cameras for an "optimum" ISO setting is that there are many variables.  If you are shooting LOG for example, how will you be de-LOGing the footage?  Will you be using a manufacturer's LOG to 709 LUT?  Something else you've designed?  It all effects the final result. And, every camera might be different as well.

 

I think first you need to learn to use your lightmeter.  And I will suggest here that you use a 35mm still camera and shoot reversal/slide film.  Why? Because slide films are very unforgiving to improper exposure and the results are easy to see.  And, because the development of slide film is standardized there will be very few variables to contend with.

 

I would suggest first shooting a couple rolls of slide film and viewing the results on a light table with a magnifying loupe.  Put the slides on the light table so that you can view them side by side and see what you've done.

 

Next you'll need to design a test.  I hope by this point you really have read about and understand how to use an incident meter vs a spot meter.

What I've done for testing is to place a white towel on the wall.  Set up your camera with the slide film on a tripod and fill the frame with the towel.  You should light the towel evenly with a light that matches the color temperature of the film you're using.  With slide film this is almost always daylight. Next, expose the towel 1st at 5 stops under the reading provided by the spot meter, at the ISO on the film box. Increase the exposure on 1/2 stop intervals until you've exposed the towel at +5 stops.  Keep in mind that the spot meter reading should expose the towel as middle gray, and not white.

 

Place the developed slides on the light table in order of darkest to lightest.  (note: it would have been helpful to place a little piece of paper on the towel that says the exposure setting for each frame!) If all has been done correctly, the frame exposed at the meter reading should look close to an 18% grey card.  Study the results on the light table and carefully look to see where the towel details become hard to see due to over/and/or under exposure.  Keep mental notes of how bright is 1/2 stop over and 2 stops under etc.

 

Armed with this knowledge, shoot a roll of slide film using only the spot meter.  For example, take a reading off someone's face and decide how bright you would like the face in the final image.  Something like reading a white skinned face and deciding that you would like it 1 stop lighter than 18% grey.  Since the spot meter always suggests an exposure for 18% grey, increase the exposure by 1 stop to expose the face at +1 stop.

 

Take a landscape photo and carefully think about how bright you want each part of the image.  You'll know from your towel test how bright and/or dark you can go before you loose shadow or highlight details.  You may find that you want detail in the forrest and in the clouds, but discover that you can't have both on your slide film.  You'll need to choose!  Or shoot it each way and keep careful notes of your exposures.

 

Once you've got this all mastered (and it will take some time!) you can then begin to start designing tests for digital camera optimum ISO settings.  And also learning how to use the incident meter.  Just keep in mind that the incident meter reading is the same as a spot reading off an 18% grey card (in the same lighting where you hold the incident meter)

 

As to calibrating the light meter, digital light meters tend to be very consistent.  If you have a new digital light meter I wouldn't worry too much about calibration, but if you have doubts, find another light meter to compare it to.


Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Glidecam

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio