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Double 8mm

negative/positive

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#1 Sebastien Lafortune-Fortin

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Posted 14 May 2018 - 07:46 PM

Hi! So, sorry for the confusion, I wasn't sure to write in 16mm or super8 but decided to write here on account that double 8mm is basically 16mm with double perforations. (with differences in developping and projecting)

 

So I got this film here and I'm quite confused about developping it, positives and negatives and whatnot. I've heard that some films are ready to be edited on a table light as soon as they're exposed while others need to be kept in the dark and sent to a lab for development (in my case, the Niagara Custom Labs in Toronto)

 

Any clue ?

 

Thanks!

 

Seb


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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 01:18 AM

Sure. All light sensitive stocks need to be kept in the dark. You want correct exposure to the light coming from a lens in a camera. After exposure the film is again protected against light until development and fixation. Full-flange spools and protection leader, additional length, help keeping light away. The outermost windings cover the inner length. After having threaded up your camera in the shadow you run the film forward in the closed camera about three feet. The veiled beginning is wound up, unexposed film brought into position behind the image aperture.

 

Once fixated the film can be viewed, projected, duplicated.

 

Double-Eight film runs twice through the camera. First run exposes one half of its width, then you swap spools and expose the other side. Processing goes as 16mm wide film, often together with 16mm material on collection rolls. After processing it gets split in two, the 8mm strips joined and returned to you. That way you have 50 ft. of Regular-Eight film out of nominal 25 ft. of Double-Eight. The actual length of a portion is about 32 ft. There is additional length on almost all portions, be they on darkroom core (magazine loads), be they on daylight loading spools.

 

You have reversal stocks and negative films. Reverse processing yields a positive image for direct projection. Negatives usually are printed onto dedicated stocks, you have so-called contact positives. The negative-positive process is the professional approach. Reversible films are the classic amateur stocks.

 

What camera do you have?


Edited by Simon Wyss, 15 May 2018 - 01:19 AM.

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#3 Sebastien Lafortune-Fortin

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 01:22 AM

I have a Kodak Brownie no 2, from 1960 if I'm not mistaken.


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#4 Simon Wyss

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 02:31 AM

Fine, a beginning. Next things to add ar a tripod and a projector. That’s the basic set. Have fun!


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#5 Sebastien Lafortune-Fortin

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 10:48 AM

Thank you!


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