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Why do people pick different lenses?

Sony Canon Zeiss Cooke Leica Sigma Panavision Arri Rokinon

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#1 Gerald King

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 08:55 PM

Is it mostly based of preference? The one's I know by name are Canon, Sony, Zeiss, Cooke's, Leica's, Sigma's, Panavision, Arri and Rokinon. 

 

I like the Zeiss super speeds because the smoothness of the gears whenever on I'm on a follow-focus rig. Also the sigma's quality I really love. Rokinon's are pretty decent for their price when you need to get something like a knock-off zeiss, I've heard people say. I own two Roks, really are impressed with them. 

 

So all in all, does it comes down to preference/price? or are there more factors? 


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#2 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 09:08 PM

Some but not all of the factors include:

-physical workflow/weight

-speed statistics

-sharpness

-how the glass renders shapes/avoids distortion

-how the glass flares

-how the glass renders color/contrast

-bokeh quality

 

Watch Shane Hurlbut visualize and verbalize glass differences


Edited by Macks Fiiod, 15 April 2018 - 09:08 PM.

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#3 Gerald King

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 06:35 PM

Some but not all of the factors include:

-physical workflow/weight

-speed statistics

-sharpness

-how the glass renders shapes/avoids distortion

-how the glass flares

-how the glass renders color/contrast

-bokeh quality

 

Watch Shane Hurlbut visualize and verbalize glass differences

Wow, I didn't know lenses were capable of different types of color/contrast I thought that was mostly based on the camera's, interesting. Time to study this. 


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#4 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 07:02 PM

I pick based on lots of factors.

 

1. Is it supposed to be an Movi-rigg or flown by a drone? Or handhel all day? Then lightweight lenses like the Zeiss T2.0's High Speeds are a good choice.

 

2. They want a high tech, crisp look? Master Primes.

 

3. They want a shallow DoF look with it being organic and not too crips? Leica or Cooke S5's.

 

4. You come to a smaller market with less equipped rental houses? They'll always have a set of Cooke S4's.

 

5. Director wants a vintage look? Or flares? Then you can get the old Kinoptik's, Panchro's and Xenon's out.

 

Every job has its own needs.


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#5 Gerald King

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 06:34 PM

I pick based on lots of factors.

 

1. Is it supposed to be an Movi-rigg or flown by a drone? Or handhel all day? Then lightweight lenses like the Zeiss T2.0's High Speeds are a good choice.

 

2. They want a high tech, crisp look? Master Primes.

 

3. They want a shallow DoF look with it being organic and not too crips? Leica or Cooke S5's.

 

4. You come to a smaller market with less equipped rental houses? They'll always have a set of Cooke S4's.

 

5. Director wants a vintage look? Or flares? Then you can get the old Kinoptik's, Panchro's and Xenon's out.

 

Every job has its own needs.

This definitely helped me with choosing which lenses I should go with. I always hear people obsess over zeisses on almost every set and I never really saw the excitement besides the clarity of it, not spectacular that popped out at me with the image on screen. I mean I felt the gears are smoother than that of the rokinon's, but then I read that the rokinon's also are Pseudo-cinema lenses. I always want to go with what the director wants in terms of what best serves the narrative of the film. Thank you for this.


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#6 Gerald King

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 06:47 PM

I pick based on lots of factors.

 

1. Is it supposed to be an Movi-rigg or flown by a drone? Or handhel all day? Then lightweight lenses like the Zeiss T2.0's High Speeds are a good choice.

 

2. They want a high tech, crisp look? Master Primes.

 

3. They want a shallow DoF look with it being organic and not too crips? Leica or Cooke S5's.

 

4. You come to a smaller market with less equipped rental houses? They'll always have a set of Cooke S4's.

 

5. Director wants a vintage look? Or flares? Then you can get the old Kinoptik's, Panchro's and Xenon's out.

 

Every job has its own needs.

That Panchro has a really nice look to it, I love the bend that it shows from the background to the foreground, very eerie. There are ways to make it appear anamorphic? Like an extension of some sort? I would love to see those oval shaped distorted lights in the background.

 

 

Edited: I mistakenly clicked on a clickbait image on google, that showed a TLS Rehoused Super Baltars

instead of a Panchro.


Edited by Gerald King, 20 April 2018 - 06:51 PM.

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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 06:57 PM

http://www.vintagele...o-trump-review/
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