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Could You Recommend a Consumer-level Video-editing Program?

editing consumer-level

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#1 Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 03:50 PM

I was looking at PowerDirector 15 and was wondering if there was anything else recommendable out there.


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#2 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 04:15 PM

Sony Vegas? It's not that expensive and does quite a bit.
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#3 Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 04:32 PM

I wondered about that. I remember it as something ancient, since I used it quite a long time ago and wondered if it even exists. Thank you! I'll look it up now. :)


Edited by Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos, 13 March 2017 - 04:33 PM.

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#4 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 06:44 PM

Why not Hitfilm? While the Pro version might be a little above consumer level, the free Express version has pretty much any feature that would be needed by a consumer - and the best part - its free and from a respected software player. Vegas is an option, but the pro versions are at least $500 (or use to be), and its really not consumer level at all - more broadcast level maybe. Vegas does have the movie studio editions, which are on par with Magix software offerings and PowerDirector, but if your going to go that route, the Express version of hitfilm will do pretty much anything those will and will save you $50-$100.

 

Hitfilm Express has effects tools too, like keying, 3D particles, and a full 3D open-cl engine. This is in addition to the editing and audio interfaces. And, if you need more tools in the future, you can upgrade to Hitfilm Pro (around $300) and take advantage of a full indie-film post production package. 

 

See: www.hitfilm.com/express

 

There is also Davinci Resolve - which is also free and includes a nice editor, color corrector, and output tools - but it has a steep learning curve, has very little audio or effects tools, and is far from consumer-level.


Edited by Landon D. Parks, 13 March 2017 - 06:54 PM.

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#5 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 12:04 AM

DaVinci needs a good graphics card to work tho, so that's one downside.
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#6 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 02:00 AM

I agree. Resolve is probably not a good option - I was just putting it out there since it is free to download and play with; added more as an afterthought than anything.

 

I still say in the arena he is looking at, Hitfilm Express is a perfect fit.


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#7 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 02:53 AM

If "consumer-level" is all you need, Vegas crushes every consumer level editor into pieces. Extremely easy and fast workflow. Not the most stable, but I control-S a lot and never run into problems with that.


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#8 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 03:37 AM

But is Vega's really consumer-level? It's probably on-par with Premiere Pro, which means it has a learning curve and more features than most consumers could ever find a use for. It's also $300 to buy. Personally, if I was going into this arena today I'd go with Hitfilm Express. From someone who has used Hitfilm Pro in the past, I can tell you that the program is very stable - fairly easy to navigate for a newbie, has plenty of output options, and more. The express version is also really good, and is basically a limited version of the Pro edition. Of course I don't use Hitfilm much any longer, having moved onto Resolve for edits and color, Protools for audio, and Fusion for VFX, and Ae for titles - but people are doing amazing work with hitfilm software.


Edited by Landon D. Parks, 14 March 2017 - 03:38 AM.

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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 04:44 AM

Quite a few consumers use Lightworks. Like all professional NLEs there's a learning curve, although the shortly due for release V14 has a fixed layout option, which new users may find more friendly. It will run on lower powered computers, although in doing so you'll have to transcode and possibly use proxy editing with the compressed HD codecs commonly used today.

 

There is a free version with limited export to 720p suitable for Youtube, the Pro version has a monthly (it reverts back to free, so you can still use it), yearly and outright licenses, the last two come bundled with Boris software. Some users just take out the monthly subscription to export a finished project. 


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#10 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 04:56 AM

The fact that Lightworks free only allows exporting to YouTube and Vimeo is troubling for me. Why set yourself up for such limitations if its not required? The last time I used Lightworks I didn't find it appealing at all. Not saying others won't, but I'm not aware of anything Lightworks does that Hitfilm Express does not do as good or better, and Hitfilm Pro is the same price as upgrading Lightworks to professional - and Hitfilm includes a full effects, titling suite, and mocha integration. Even the free version of hitfilm does not limit you to exporting only to YouTube and Vimeo.


Edited by Landon D. Parks, 14 March 2017 - 05:00 AM.

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#11 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 05:34 AM

NLEs are personal things people like one and not another , I suspect the 720p limitation is due to the licensing costs and in the end Lightworks want users to move up to the Pro version.However, you are not limited to exporting to online with the free version, you can also export to your hard drive. Lightworks is designed for editing Long form narrative productions with collaborative teams, so is like Avid in that respect.

 

If you take out a one year or an outright license with Lightworks, you get Boris software bundled with it.


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#12 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 12:29 PM

But is Vega's really consumer-level?

I've never really believed in certain middle-man terms like "prosumer". Either the industry messes with it or they don't. I find it very difficult to find someone making a living off editing using Vegas. Sure you could find one or two guys, but in the grand scheme of statistics they are the exception, not the rule.

 

Everyone I've ever met under 17 getting into video editing (a bit under 100 people) would start with Windows Movie Maker and end up pirating Sony Vegas, learning full-control editing that way. I honestly wonder if the company owning that software in particular even cares, cause they've made no effort to slow down people from doing that, as opposed to Adobe or AVID.


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#13 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 12:57 PM

Vegas isn't really a professional piece of software because it's very limiting in terms of it's codec's and computers it can run on.

As I've said many times, the industry runs on Pro Res and DNX. If you can't do those two codec's, the software is worthless as a professional tool. Nobody takes MPEG files as master deliverables.

Furthermore, most cameras today shoot quite a bit of "raw" codec's. So being able to support those, is very critical.

This is why Avid, Premiere and DaVinci are the three top tools used today.
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#14 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 12:59 PM

Vegas does get used by professionals running small self contained companies or single person outfits, say in the corporate sector or similar, but it's not the best choice for people wanting to work as a freelance editor. .I gather the latest version can use ProRes and it can also handle Redcode.


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#15 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 01:12 PM

As of Pro 12, yes is can run both of those files you mentioned.


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#16 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 01:13 PM

But it can't "export" Pro Res... that's the problem.
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#17 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 01:24 PM

The highest codec I've seen Vegas do by DEFAULT is the XDCAM format cameras like the F3 record internally to. I also suppose one could render to Sony's AVC codec and set the bit rate super high. There's a free plugin pack that lets you export Raw uncompressed but that isn't necessarily practical in many situations.

 

As of now I have not seen Vegas have ProRes export features either. But if Red Cine X can do it on Windows machines there is hope for it one day.


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#18 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 01:31 PM

The non Pro Res export isn't an issue for many professional purposes, Pro Res isn't a delivery format for many broadcasters.

 

The current formats from Magix site: DVD, Blu-ray Disc, AVCHD Disc, (DV-)AVI, MJPEG, MXF, MOV, WMV, XAVC, XAVC S, MPEG-1/2/4, H.264/AVC, H.265/HEVC, WAV, MP3, BMP, PNG, JPEG, TIFF, OpenEXR- , DPX- and WDP image sequences


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#19 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 01:52 PM

I mean, in my line of work and exporting from program to program etc. Vegas lifting that bottleneck could seriously propel itself into consideration for industry standard.

 

Codecs and stability are the only things I dislike about Vegas (pretty sizable, I know). Everything else with that program is fantastic.


Edited by Macks Fiiod, 14 March 2017 - 01:53 PM.

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#20 Matt Thomas

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 02:00 PM

Big fan of DaVinci over here, and it's free.

 

Can bog down (if your files are 4K RED) but there are work arounds, and it's free.

 

The color grading is awesome, and it's free. 

 

You can export in a lot of different ways, and it's free. 

 

You know what it's actually pretty powerful, for how free it is. 


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