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16H Pre war and speed


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#1 Frederic Frot

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 03:34 AM

I got an old one. I have check the speed with a strob and for 16 frame it run only at 15.2 fps...

As the speed tune knob isn't indexed i slighty ture it to obtain 16fps precisely.

For the method, i use the strob on the shutter disc.

 

My question is :

The method is right?

Which is the tolerance for the fps on a camera?

 

PS:

I will send later for servicing my camera to Bolex factory. Juste need some money for...

 

 

 


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#2 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 04:38 AM

All Bolexes slow down a bit as the spring winds down, and may run a little faster at the start of a roll when the take-up spindle is not being forced to slip as much - putting less load on the spring motor - so especially for older models that have less constant spring motors it's not a particularly exact thing.

 

For a pre-war Bolex that may not have been used for decades yours is pretty close!

 

Did you check it under load (with some film or when holding the take-up spindle)? With the spring fully wound, and after it had run for 10 or more seconds?

 

A strobe on the shutter or claw is a good way to check speed if you have a strobe gun. Bolex originally supplied technicians with little strobe discs (similar to what you find on record players) that fitted to the external drive shaft, with upper and lower tolerances. I can"t remember what the tolerance on those discs was though, maybe half a fps at 24? That's only a 2 percent error.

 

A service is always useful if you can afford it, but the really old Bolexes are more collectors pieces than working cameras, so don't spend a fortune if it's just for a bit of fun. Adjusting the speed dial up a bit is fine if you just want it running closer to 16fps, no need to send it to Yverdon for that.


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#3 Frederic Frot

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:10 AM

Thanks Dom.

I didn't try with a film now, but in few week i would do it.

The Bolex technician told me that for old H16 they must run 20s at 24fps without slowdown.

For mine, the speed is constant without charge exept at the end with a slighty lost of speed.

I have use my work strobe gun.

 

I will do a service later. I will use the camera for fun (not as pro) for sure. For me it's not a static collection object. It's alive and need to be use. As for old racing bike or car, the best way to prserve them is to use them.


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#4 Simon Wyss

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 12:09 PM

Les mécanismes doivent être propre et ont besoin des lubrifiants.

Une caméra déserve du service. Ne vas pas trop vite avec elle.

 

Advantage of the older models is that you have the speed range down to 8 fps and a 190 degrees shutter opening angle.


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#5 Frederic Frot

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:59 PM

I will take care of them and use them only at 16fps. The other advantage is the quality of the camera.

Last week end i just add a second one but youger. A L8 year 1950 :) (she work and was only 10€ ...)

And maybee a '50 H16 will be there too sooner.


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#6 Michael Carter

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 11:18 AM

16 fps can be synced to sound recorded on a digital pocket recorder using Final Cut Pro X, which is what I do.
Sound is half the movie!

Edited by Michael Carter, 23 March 2017 - 11:18 AM.

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