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Day for Night filters pre 1980s


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#21 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 09:39 AM

 

No David, we're using a big flaming torch.

 

Seems odd, but maybe you could find an ND grad filter that is just an fuzzy ND dot in the center and clear all around...


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#22 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 09:54 AM

That's fine as long as you don't clip anything, because if you do, it will be odd-looking once you darken it for a night look.

 

 

Yes it wasn't really technical .. just his amazement at shooting day for night ,pretty much the same as you would for straight day.. compared to how he had done it, Im sure many times over, on film..  


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#23 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 01:31 PM

What actually may have helped in the Mad Max example was ND'ing down and shooting at wide apertures since that's what would actually happen at night. In a lot of old movies that did day for night, they were shooting desert exteriors T16, which did not look very convincing.
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#24 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 09:16 PM

No ND,s mentioned..just opening up the iris to the max.. without clipping I presume.. the DIT wanted max data for grading.. which was counter intuitive for him,compared to how he would have done it on film.. don't have the link now.. it was John Seale and the B cam DP.. an ACS presentation.. might still be online.. very interesting.. about the whole making of MM from the original 3D camera option .. 


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#25 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 10:19 PM

Here the link:

It was posted here a few times when the film came out, David Burr, ACS was the 2nd Unit DP.
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#26 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 10:27 PM

You'd need ND filters -- in direct sunlight you'd be at f/16 with no ND's if you rated the camera at 50 ASA.  At 400 ASA at f/16, you'd be overexposing by three stops over normal.


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#27 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 11:57 PM

ah yes ... that would be right.. I cant remember if they said if they were actually shooting right at midday .. but yes I guess they must have been shooting with some ND..  keep forgetting there are camera,s without in built ND,s.. .. :)

 

Thanks for the link Satsuki .. seems some copy right thing going on.. great talk though..


Edited by Robin R Probyn, 02 May 2016 - 12:07 AM.

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#28 George Ebersole

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 05:55 AM

David Mullen ASC; your stills and VIMEO footage remind me of the final showdown between the wizard and dragon in the Disney-Paramount coproduction of "Dragonslayer".  I never gave any day for night shots much credence because nothing of what I saw on the screen looked like what the human eye sees at night, but it's very amazing to me that those day for night shots really hit a homerun when emulating what an actual night shoot would look like with the right technology.  I've got new respect for the DPs who did all those day for night shots pre 1980s.  Incredible.
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#29 George Ebersole

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 02:10 AM

Here are some screen grabs off another site, and they illustrate the point I was trying to make;

 

http://horrorcultfil...agonslayer5.jpg

 

http://4.bp.blogspot...gonslayer07.jpg

 

http://4.bp.blogspot...csnap-00048.jpg

 

Those are all studio shots, but to my eyes they look like they were shot with a low light DSLR without any filters.  Derek Vanlint (director of photography)  knew what he was doing.  Wow.  

 

Overall I think it's one of the best shot films of all time, but the night sequences compared to your posted footage, really blow me away.

 


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#30 Mark Kenfield

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 02:21 AM

For all of the above reasons (and more), I prefer to shoot dusk-for-night wherever possible.
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