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Super 8 Vision 200t vs 500t for indoor shooting


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#1 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 09:55 PM

Hi, I was wondering if you could help me with my questions regarding new Vision 200t and 500t super8 film stocks from Kodak. I am planning to shoot indoors - during the day - with (most likely) available lighting (maybe very little artificial lighting). Which one of the film will produce a better (sharper, clearer, crisper, etc) picture quality? What is the main difference between these two film stocks?

Would you also know a book that would take me through - from begginers to advanced - either film stock, processing, etc or super 8 or both?

Thanks a lot
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 12:24 AM

They are very similar-looking stocks; the only difference is that 500T is 1 1/3 stops faster than 200T, which means that it is also slightly grainier than 200T. So IF you can shoot on 200T stock, then do it, but if not, then use the 500T.

It wouldn't be hard to take some light meter readings of your locations and get an idea if 200T is fast enough. Also, there's no law saying that you can't shoot some scenes on 200T and others on 500T. Or that you can't add some lighting to allow you to keep shooting on 200T as it gets darker.
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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 10:28 AM

They are very similar-looking stocks; the only difference is that 500T is 1 1/3 stops faster than 200T, which means that it is also slightly grainier than 200T. So IF you can shoot on 200T stock, then do it, but if not, then use the 500T.

It wouldn't be hard to take some light meter readings of your locations and get an idea if 200T is fast enough. Also, there's no law saying that you can't shoot some scenes on 200T and others on 500T. Or that you can't add some lighting to allow you to keep shooting on 200T as it gets darker.




Also keep in mind that if you will be shooting during the day with available light, that means that you will have to put an 85 filter on the lens for correct color balance. So you have to take this into account as well. I don't know, you may like the mixed color temps, this could be an interesting look, but if you want all the color to be the same, then you will have to use either and 85 filter, gel the windows, gel the lights or any combination of the three. If you end up using the 500T, rate it at 400 to help minimize grain, if so desired.


chris
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#4 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 08:03 PM

David and Zaefrod, thank you very much for your replies!
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#5 Will Montgomery

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 05:13 PM

While 200T and 500T are supposed to look similar, its been my experience that 500T is noticibly grainier... but another thing to think about is the tendency to rely on higher speed film when better lighting might be the answer. Just because you've got 500T speed doesn't mean you shouldn't do your best to light the scene. That will help with keeping grain down.
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#6 steve hyde

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 06:33 PM

...I agree. I use both of these stocks in Super 8 and 16mm. Light for one stop overexposure. Don't be afraid to overexpose these color negatives. I'm always amazed at how many people are worried about overexposing this stock. I'm still learning how to use it, but based on the tests I've already shot, I'm going to rate 7218 at EI 250 the next time I shoot it. I've been shooting 7217 at about EI 100 with good results.

I suggest shooting two test rolls and light for mid aperatures and shoot at mid focal lengths if you want minimized grain.

If you have a high contrast situation 7218 will give you a bit more exposure latitude, but otherwise in ideal light conditions and one stop overexposure, I bet you will find the stocks will look about the same. 7218 is often used in low light conditions and night photography so it gets a reputation for being too grainy.

There is really no substitute for lighting well - but for spontaneous shooting you will find color negatives offer low contrast images, amazing color and a lot of grain.

Edit: (grain applies to super 8....Super 16 has much finer grained results)

Steve

Edited by steve hyde, 23 December 2005 - 06:38 PM.

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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 12:47 PM

A bit of overexposure on color negative film will generally help reduce graininess, give more shadow detail, and "richer" blacks.
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#8 Sean DelGatto

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 09:38 PM

Oh man, that just killed the happiness. RIP John, thank you for your contribution to this Forum.


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