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Old Kodak 500T - How Should It Be Exposed?

exposure 500T old stock film 16mm 7219

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#1 Kurt Cassidy-Gabhart

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 05:33 PM

  Dear Cinematographers,

 

 Been carrying around two 100 ft. rolls of 16mm 500T film for the last year. It has been in a 10˚-20˚ cooler for six months. Someone told me freezing negative film would cause the remjet to stick, so I then refrigerated it in about 40˚ for six months. Now that I am ready to shoot it, the question presents itself: How am I to expose it in order to compensate for the yearlong stagnation? That is, if it not already too late.

 

   Sincerely Grateful,

 

    Kurt Cassidy-Gabhart


Edited by Kurt Cassidy-Gabhart, 27 October 2017 - 05:33 PM.

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#2 Samuel Berger

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 06:56 PM

I can't find the post, but a few years back someone asked this and the answer they got was "expose as 320T". Hopefully someone will corroborate or correct this.


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#3 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 01:25 AM

1-1.5 stop per decade is my rule. But since film can take overexposure quite well, never hurts to err on the side of that.


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#4 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 02:09 AM

Honestly, I've not seen much if any degradation from year old film compared to new. I mostly shoot on year old stock and it looks no different than new.

If you're in the 1 - 3 year bracket, it doesn't vary much. Things start to change over 3 years.
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#5 aapo lettinen

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 06:59 AM

should'nt be much difference compared to new film. 

 

freezing is only necessary if you need to store the film for many years, for example knowing that you won't shoot the stuff in the next 4 years or more. 

It may not be a good idea to freeze opened cans, you never know how much humidity there is inside and it may lead to unexpected results. factory fresh unopened cans can be frozen more reliably.

 

for storing film about an year or two, I would never freeze it. completely unnecessary and there is always a risk of damaging the film when freezing.

 

EXPOSED film is a different matter, it ages much quicker than raw stock. you start to see clear effects in couple of months and if storing for example one year before developing, there is serious effects in the image already and you need to compensate with special processing


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