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Home processing ECN-2 in a Lomo tank


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#1 Matthew Modget

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 11:34 AM

Andec messed up one of my films (thankfully there was nothing important on it) so I decided to see how hard it would be to process Vision3 stocks in my Lomo tank.

 

 

I left the remjet removal until after processing and it went horribly wrong, that stuff gets everywhere! It ended up with me and my girlfriend being fairly rough with the film, wiping it on both sides multiple times until it stopped leaving a black mark on the kitchen paper. I was expecting it to be covered with marks and scratches but the main problem with it from what I can see is uneven development. I think next time I might put slightly less CD3 in the developer and develop for 5 minutes instead of 3. It also didn't help that as I was doing this late at night I wasn't bashing the Lomo tank around as much as I normally do so I probably didn't get rid of all the air bubbles.

 

Here's to next time!


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#2 Jeremy Cavanagh

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 12:00 PM

I was given hands on instructions for developing colour neg using a Lomo tank and the first part of the process was removing the remjet. This worked well it just required lots of washing to flush out both the now dissolved remjet and the solution used before going onto the first developing phase. The final task once the film was developed was to use a wet sponge to remove any remjet still clinging to the film but that really was just a check before hanging the film up to dry.


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#3 Matthew Modget

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 12:09 PM

I used Borax to soften it so I have a massive bag of that as well as sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, what was your method?


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#4 Jeremy Cavanagh

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 05:07 PM

I will have to dig out the formula but it revolved around Borax with the resulting solution heated to a particular temp and then timed in the Lomo tank. One thing that seemed to happen was that the solution lost effectiveness once it had been used on 2 or 3 films and the guy tutoring me suggested that the Borax needed replenishing.


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#5 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 01:00 AM

I've had this problem when processing old kodachrome rolls, too (in caffenol). I've tried washing soda and lots of washing, but it didn't do much. I've ended up wiping it off after every time with pec pads. I'd really love to hear more about the borax method!


Edited by Josh Gladstone, 06 April 2014 - 01:01 AM.

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#6 Sean Simpson

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 12:08 AM

Can you guys share the formulas and processing times for ECN-2 using CD-3 and not cross processed in C-41 chemicals.  I've found the standard Kodak doc which seems to be discussed the most on posts about this topic, which provides formulas for chems, but many of the raw ingredients seem obscure like Proxel GXL.  The document does not get into times and temps for each stage as it was meant for machine processing, not lomo tank processing.


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#7 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 12:46 PM

It truly is much easier to just remove the remjet after processing when using manual methods.  Just soak the film in a Borax solution warmed to the same as processing temperature.  Let the film soak for at least 5 minutes.  Use at least 2 tablespoons household Borax per Liter, more if the backing seems to stubborn.  Due to the low cost, I use a fresh batch each time I process any film with remjet backing.  Anyhow, it really helps to have  a few sponges, photo grade or equivalent on hand and a film rewinder or set of rewinds.   I have them mounted onto a 2 x 4inch board about 4 feet in length so it can be clamped to a work table or lab sink with a large C-Clamp.   After the film has soaked, I transfer all the film from the developing reel to a 50ft projection reel. This reel sits in a small tank or tray also with a Borax solution.   This way, the remjet will come off physically and less will get onto your reels and equipment.

 

I manually wipe off the remjet the first few feet so I have enough slack film to wind onto the film reel on the Rewinder.  Then, I have a large sponge soaked with the solution placed so the film will run over it remjet side down.  With another solution soaked sponge folded over the film, I slowly wind the film onto the takeup reel on the Rewinder, and every few feet I rinse out the sponge in a bucket and resoak it with solution again and continue.  Keeping an eye on the large sponge the film runs over, I wringe out that sponge as well and resoak it.  Once the film has wound onto the takeup reel, I then switch places and do this again.  The second pass will get anything not removed the first time.  Only thing left is then to Wash the film once again 2-4 minutes to remove all traces of Borax solution in the emulsion.  Then to soak the film in a Stabilizer/ Drying agent prior to hanging it or winding onto a Film Drying Rack to dry.

 

For equipment cleanup, you can use old toothbrushes (soft bristle ones work best) and some Borax or Washing Soda solution and soak in a bucket, light scrubbing with the brush in the reels, and a good rinse off, and then wipe dry which will get off other residue onto the towel. 

 

Once you have done all this a few times, you'll establish your own work habits for it and it goes quickly.  Good luck!


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#8 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 03:12 PM

Forgot to add, do not forget to filter your chemistry!  This is very important and can be done quite easily with cheesecloth and/or various water filters.  Once strained clean, the chemistry will be fine for reuse.


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#9 Juha Mattila

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 11:12 AM

If you remove remjet after processing is there a risk that remjet particles will stick on emulsion side?


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#10 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 02:46 AM

No. That's not an issue. Kodak don't state this clearly as they always think in terms of machine processing which is dry to dry. Yes, if any remjet is allowed to dry on the emulsion side, it won't come off. But if any that gets there is removed while the film is wet it isn't an issue
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