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New in Super8 world, help please!!

super 8 wein cell yashica cartridge kodachrome 40 help film asa 40d 200d

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#1 Francisco Sanfeliu Escuder

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Posted 24 December 2016 - 07:53 PM

Hi everyone,

 

First of all, my name is Zranfisco, and I’m new in this world.

 

A few days ago I found my grandfather’s old super 8 camera (a Yashica super 825), and I have not idea of how to use it, what cartridge I have to buy and things like that.

 

So I was looking for information in internet when I reached to your forum, and I think that I could find the help that I need, I want to be a regular super 8 user. For example, I have already found the Wein Cell’s battery that substitutes old mercury 1.3V batteries.

 

I think that my most important question is: What cartridges I can use? The camera was with a Kodachrome 40D, but internet say’s that now is impossible to process it.

 

Thank you

 

PD: more information about the camera

 

YASHICA SUPER-825

-marketed in 1969-70

-silent super 8 cartridge

-lens: Yashinon Zoom f: 1.8 \ F: 12-30 mm

-zooming ratio: 2.5x

-focusing: fixed

-zooming: manual

-filter size: 43 mm

-viewfinder: single-lens reflex with adjustable eyepiece

-viewfinder information: f/stop meter

-exposure: auto exposure control; TTL EE, CdS photocell

-EE lock: yes

-film speed: auto for 25/40 and 100/160 ASA (daylight/tungsten)

-CCA filter: built-in 85A filter; with filter switch; automatic cancelation with dylight cartridge or with -----filter key

-filming speed: 18 fps

-shutter opening angle: <180 degrees

-sound: no

-remote control socket: no

-cable release socket: no

-movie light socket: kodak type

-film counter: 1-15 m

-handle: retractable, chamber for penlight batteries

-battery check button: yes

-film drive motor: DC micromotor

-power source: 4 x AA batteries \ 1 x 1.3V button cell for light meter

-weight: circa 1000 g

-dimensions: 55 x 125 x 195 mm \ 55 x 230 x 195 mm

-tripod socket: 1/4"

-made in Japan by Cosina

 

yashica_super_825.jpg

 

Source: http://www.filmkorn.org/super8data/database/cameras_list/cameras_yashica/cameras_yashica.htm


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#2 Heikki Repo

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 07:04 AM

Hi Francisco,

are you looking to project your films or to edit them on your computer? At the moment there are only few reversal film options -- that is, films you can watch with a projector after processing them.

With your camera, for projecting your best bet would probably be Tri-X black and white film.

If you are looking to edit your films on a computer, you could buy Vision3 negative film -- both 50D (for outdoors and lots of light) and 200T (balanced for incandescent light / halogen, faster film -- can be used outdoors and corrected with a filter or in color grading on your computer) would be your best option.

The problem with your camera is that it only supports film speeds of 40/160. Tri-X comes close to 160 so it won't be too much overexposed. 50D and 200T like a little overexposure, so as they are interpreted by the camera to be 40 and 160 they'll work well.

I suggest you test the camera functions without film first. These are all old cameras (Kodak is bringing out a new super-8 camera next Spring though) and film&processing does cost money, so try to choose the cheapest route to test the basic functions: does the motor turn, does the lighting meter react to different light levels...
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#3 Francisco Sanfeliu Escuder

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 07:07 PM

Hi Francisco,

are you looking to project your films or to edit them on your computer? At the moment there are only few reversal film options -- that is, films you can watch with a projector after processing them.

With your camera, for projecting your best bet would probably be Tri-X black and white film.

If you are looking to edit your films on a computer, you could buy Vision3 negative film -- both 50D (for outdoors and lots of light) and 200T (balanced for incandescent light / halogen, faster film -- can be used outdoors and corrected with a filter or in color grading on your computer) would be your best option.

The problem with your camera is that it only supports film speeds of 40/160. Tri-X comes close to 160 so it won't be too much overexposed. 50D and 200T like a little overexposure, so as they are interpreted by the camera to be 40 and 160 they'll work well.

I suggest you test the camera functions without film first. These are all old cameras (Kodak is bringing out a new super-8 camera next Spring though) and film&processing does cost money, so try to choose the cheapest route to test the basic functions: does the motor turn, does the lighting meter react to different light levels...

Hi Heikki,

 

Thanks a lot for your help. I am looking to edit my films on the computer. I think that I'm going to buy Vision3 50D, because I want to film outside, during the day, but first I'm going to check the basic functions of the camera, as you advised me.

 

Thank you again.

 

Francisco


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#4 Danny Nguyen

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 11:12 PM

Hey Francisco,

The first thing you should always do is shoot a test roll, I highly recommend shooting a roll of B/W Tri-X since it's a cheap stock to buy and process, Before actually investing in a telecine always contact your lab to provide a camera report before digitizing. In terms of labs I been very pleased with Spectra Film and Video in North Hollywood, they process B/W Reversal, Color Neg, and even E6! They have a lot of experience with Super 8 and will be able to provide you with all the information needed to ensure you have the best experience with Super 8. Good luck! 


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