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WSJ Is Saying That It's Now the Time to Buy a 4K TV

4K TV WSJ

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#1 Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 01:32 PM

Here's what they say:

 

 

Increasingly affordable, 4K TVs are streaming football and films into Americans’ homes with stunning quality. Here’s everything you need to know—and why it’s time to finally buy

 

 

A Geek’s Guide to the 4K TV Revolution

 

Perhaps this is the beginning of 4K becoming mainstream.


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#2 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 01:52 PM

Who the heck owns a TV tho? Like really? This ain't 1998 ya know! TV is DEAD!

4k DLP laser projector? Yep, tell me when the prices get to $2k ish and I'll bite! :D
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#3 Samuel Berger

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 01:59 PM

Who the heck owns a TV tho? Like really?

Anyone with kids who like Nintendo. ;-)


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#4 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 02:04 PM

Anyone with kids who like Nintendo. ;-)


Meh, they play the hand-held devices today. I know lots of kids and parents, mobile is the way to go.

So yea, still confused!

Ohh and where does one get 4k media? Like I got 3 UHD BluRay's... and Netflix/Amazon ain't streaming in 4k really, I ain't waiting for a buffer.
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#5 Keith Walters

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:33 PM

Too many people are still paying for their 3-D TVs which were the LBT (Last Big Thing).

It's jsut another same old same ol' same ol': How do we convince consumers they need a new TV when there's nothing wrong with their old one.... 


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#6 Samuel Berger

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:36 PM

Too many people are still paying for their 3-D TVs which were the LBT (Last Big Thing).

It's jsut another same old same ol' same ol': How do we convince consumers they need a new TV when there's nothing wrong with their old one.... 

 

My previous TV was HD 1080p and weighed 95 pounds. Our new one is 4K and only 32 pounds. You only learn to appreciate this progress stuff when you have to move somewhere.


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#7 Ryan Constantino

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 03:41 AM

I'm so bored of the high resolution debate. Steve Yedlin said some really interesting things about high resolutions which make a lot of sense. Check it out here: http://yedlin.net/ResDemo/ I'm sure this link gets tossed around a lot. But when he talks about compression of data rates for exhibition that it jacks up the image so much, there''s not much point of "watching 4k" when your internet is too slow to sustain the high bit rates needed for true actual quality 4k images. The debate is never ending, but I'm with Keith, I really believe that manufacturers just want to sell you the hot new thing you're willing to buy. 


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#8 Keith Walters

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 07:18 PM

A huge amount of video is still watched on either 720 x 480 or 720 x 576, which is close enough to the resolution of the original 1941 monochrome NTSC standard!  A lot of the actual content doesn't even approach that resolution.

There's no major demand for higher resolution, at least for living room sized TVs, it's just something manufacturers have pulled out of their collective arses in the hope of talking up a new market.


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#9 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 08:01 PM

The only demand is that created by the TV manufacturers and their hype departments. If you stick the average person in front of a 1080 vs UHD TV, and they are standing a typical distance back, the visual difference is just not there. However, if you tell them which one is the UHD TV, they will think it looks better. It's all down to marketing.


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#10 Richard_Swearinger

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Posted 06 February 2018 - 11:21 AM

Don't you people ever go to Costco? Pretty much all they sell is 4K tvs and the sample footage they show on them is amazing. And if you stop by the DirectTV kiosk in the store, you will learn that they stream in 4K and that some sports are starting to be streamed in 4K (I think it's mainly golf at the moment).

The NFL is already shooting 4k though I don't think they're broadcasting it yet and Sony has some kind of hypnowheel that they're using on production companies to get them to buy 4K equipment: https://www.sony.fi/...equips-mediapro

So it's out there but as for when it will make it into the average American home? Probably 5 to 15 years.


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#11 David Hessel

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Posted 06 February 2018 - 12:21 PM

Yes I have, they do look nice up close but we I stand back at the  distance I would be watching from at home there isn't much difference and certainly not enough to make me want to ditch the one I already have. They also tend to have that horrible smooth motion setting on that always bugs me when I see it, which doesn't help. My current tv is over 10 years old but it is still great and HD is plenty good. I might be able to see a slight increase in sharpness with 4K but it is not worth the extra expense when what I have is already great. HDR and Bt 2020 are the only reason I would consider upgrading my current tv at this point.


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