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Snagged this Mitchell off Ebay.


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#21 Marc Alucard

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Posted 12 January 2008 - 07:56 PM

I thought they were white to keep them cooler outdoors.

It is too bad that Mitchell information hasn't been collected and published to any extent.

Mitchell cameras touch a large part of entertainment and technology in the 20th Century....and into the 21st.

I have a 1929 Standard and a BNC that was mirror reflexed and shot the TV series "I SPY".

How about it Stephan?
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#22 Stephen Williams

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 03:05 AM

I thought they were white to keep them cooler outdoors.

It is too bad that Mitchell information hasn't been collected and published to any extent.

Mitchell cameras touch a large part of entertainment and technology in the 20th Century....and into the 21st.

I have a 1929 Standard and a BNC that was mirror reflexed and shot the TV series "I SPY".

How about it Stephan?


Hi Marc,

I know a Fries modified High Speed (o GC) thats on a Milo Motion Control in Germany it's sn 35, so probably about 10 years older than yours!

Stephen
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#23 Marc Alucard

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 03:17 PM

Hi Marc,

I know a Fries modified High Speed (o GC) thats on a Milo Motion Control in Germany it's sn 35, so probably about 10 years older than yours!

Stephen


Hi Stephan,
I know my Standard is not nearly the oldest , but it is completely un-modified. All the masks, horizontal left and right, vertical top and bottom and the iris and iris position controls are all functioning and intact.

It even has the binocular, keyhole and round and oval masks in the wheel.

How many cameras do you think Fries modified?

I would be interested in gathering as much information on Mitchell cameras. I'll take North America if you handle Europe.

I wonder how many are still out there working, and in what capacities.

Marc

Sorry for hijacking the thread. Paul please let us know when you get the camera.
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#24 Stephen Williams

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 04:23 PM

How many cameras do you think Fries modified?

I wonder how many are still out there working, and in what capacities.

Marc


Hi Marc,

I get the feeling Fries modified a great many cameras, they designed their own camera the 435 as Doug Fries told me weren't that many cameras left to modify!

Most Mitchell GC's seem to be used on MOCO rigs, VFX or stop motion. They probably aren't being used very often now, but I am sure at least half the cameras ever made are still usable. Since production stopped about 45 years ago that's quite an achivement.

Stephen
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#25 Matthew Buick

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 05:44 PM

if you feel REALLY tired all the time and your hair starts falling out in clumps. that would be a good clue as well. :rolleyes:


Or you could just have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. ;)
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#26 Paul Bruening

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 08:53 PM

Hijack nothing, Marc. This is fascinating stuff. Ya'll keep at it.
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#27 Patrick Neary

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 09:02 PM

Hey fellow Mitchellonians!

I recently picked up what is essentially a GC, but it's placarded as a "Mitchell Chronograph"

The main difference seems to be a facility for adding some kind of data imprinting to the gate. The turret also looks a bit more like a 2709 in that it's round (but still mounted on a flat-back standard)

It also has a slightly different shutter lever than the stock GC, and has a built in tach on the back of the camera.

It has a high serial number (10xx) but I wonder if that many were actually made, or the first numbers refer to the model?....
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#28 Marc Alucard

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 09:27 PM

Hey fellow Mitchellonians!

I recently picked up what is essentially a GC, but it's placarded as a "Mitchell Chronograph"

The main difference seems to be a facility for adding some kind of data imprinting to the gate. The turret also looks a bit more like a 2709 in that it's round (but still mounted on a flat-back standard)

It also has a slightly different shutter lever than the stock GC, and has a built in tach on the back of the camera.

It has a high serial number (10xx) but I wonder if that many were actually made, or the first numbers refer to the model?....



Sounds like a "Mitchell Chronograph" that is a cross between a GC and a SS.

Does it have a second indicator dial sticking out near the film plane or just a plugged hole?

The government used these quite a bit with very long lenses and in conjunction with thedolites for missile and rocket tests.

If you look at the cameras from the old Nasa launches there are always a number of them.

They are even shown in "Close Encounters".
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#29 Patrick Neary

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 09:44 PM

Hi Marc-

It has the plugged hole: here's (I'll try at least) a terrible photo (from the original seller):


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#30 chuck colburn

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 12:37 PM

Hi Marc-

It has the plugged hole: here's (I'll try at least) a terrible photo (from the original seller):


That turret hole on top looks like it might be a Nikon mount conversion. That little tab sticking out on the top looks like a lens release lever which you would have to press to release the lens. The Bell & Howell 2709 is a fixed pin shuttle movement as opposed to the Mitchell sliding pin registration type movement.

Chuck
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#31 Patrick Neary

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 01:29 PM

Quite right about the Nikon mount, it also has a quick-set mount on one port which is handy for the Mitchell-mount lenses.

My reference to the 2709 was more about the shape of the turret, I've never seen a Mitchell with this 2709-ish turret. I've only seen the more common round disc set into the square standard. I suppose this turret design accommodates the data port.

The other cool thing is the tach, which is part of the shutter-angle control assembly on the rear. Although it does interfere with the mounting of the standard ac/dc variable speed motor (the motor's tach bumps into the shutter lever if it's set anywhere above 50-degrees or so) My solution was to just remove the tachometer from the motor, although this camera will be used primarily for hand-cranking fun, so the on-camera tach is handy for that! I'm finding that the 2-turns/sec for 16fps is pretty easy to hit and maintain though :)

I'd love to see a B&H movement up close and in action; the guts of any Mitchell are just awe-inspiring in their precision and simplicity!
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#32 chuck colburn

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 02:56 PM

Quite right about the Nikon mount, it also has a quick-set mount on one port which is handy for the Mitchell-mount lenses.

My reference to the 2709 was more about the shape of the turret, I've never seen a Mitchell with this 2709-ish turret. I've only seen the more common round disc set into the square standard. I suppose this turret design accommodates the data port.

The other cool thing is the tach, which is part of the shutter-angle control assembly on the rear. Although it does interfere with the mounting of the standard ac/dc variable speed motor (the motor's tach bumps into the shutter lever if it's set anywhere above 50-degrees or so) My solution was to just remove the tachometer from the motor, although this camera will be used primarily for hand-cranking fun, so the on-camera tach is handy for that! I'm finding that the 2-turns/sec for 16fps is pretty easy to hit and maintain though :)

I'd love to see a B&H movement up close and in action; the guts of any Mitchell are just awe-inspiring in their precision and simplicity!


This is a fun site.

http://www.cinematog...MERAS1.htm#bell
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#33 Paul Bruening

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 08:19 PM

Cool site. Thanks, Chuck.
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#34 Patrick Neary

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 09:16 PM

Another good one:

http://www.cameragui...htm~top.main_hp

Down the page a bit you'll find Russ Alsobrook's 5-part "Machines that Made the Movies" series. Good stuff!
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#35 chuck colburn

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 09:45 PM

Yeah real good stuff.

thanks,

Chuck
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#36 Marc Alucard

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 10:05 PM

Look what showed up on eBay today.

Mitchell On eBay

Can anybody shed some light on all that is there??

I am not the seller and don't know the seller.
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#37 Stephen Williams

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 03:27 AM

Look what showed up on eBay today.

Mitchell On eBay

Can anybody shed some light on all that is there??

I am not the seller and don't know the seller.


Hi,

Looks rather expensive today, in 1993 one would expect to pay $6000 for a body to reflex, they were still in great demand for VFX units.

Stephen
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#38 Lester Dunton

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 09:10 PM

We are in the process of moving Mitchell camera, which was not part of the equipment sale to Panavision. We still have all the records and spare parts stored.
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#39 Hal Smith

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 09:48 PM

We are in the process of moving Mitchell camera, which was not part of the equipment sale to Panavision. We still have all the records and spare parts stored.

My goodness, this thread gets better and better. JDC in the house and Linwood Dunn's ( http://en.wikipedia....Linwood_G._Dunn ) personal Mitchell to boot! All we need now is Martin Hill wading in.
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#40 Patrick Neary

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 10:22 PM

We are in the process of moving Mitchell camera, which was not part of the equipment sale to Panavision. We still have all the records and spare parts stored.


Thank you for entering the discussion! I would love to find out how to access the Mitchell records, especially anything pertaining to Mitchell Chronograph #1074, to be specific! :)
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