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Help! Shooting my first feature


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#1 STIJN

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 02:22 PM

I'm shooting my first feature in a few days and I'm having last minute panic attacks! I'm using Kodak/Pro8 negative film (500T, 200T and 50D). The camera is a Beaulieu 6008S. What are the settings I need to use for tungsten and daylight film? Sun or light bulb? I'm so used to put my "sun" setting for Kodachrome 40, that I'm totally confused. Would any kind soul explain to me (like if I was 2 years old) the right setting for each film...

500 T Sun or lightbulb?
200 T Sun or lightbulb?
50 D: Sun or lightbulb?

The answer is not that easy, I think...

Thanks!
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#2 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 03:55 PM

you're shooting a feature and you're using stocks you've never used before in a camera you don't quite know how to operate? anyway, to answer the question we need to know what light you're shooting in. i'd probably leave the knob in the bulb position and use external filters as appropriate.

/matt
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 04:02 PM

Since K40 and E160 were tungsten-balanced, the "sun" switch flips in an internal 85A orange filter for correcting 5500K daylight to 3400K tungsten, which is what these film stocks were balanced for (3400K photoflood illumination, i.e. "Type A" film.) The "lightbulb" switch actually just means no filter.

Modern tungsten-balanced stocks are actually balanced for 3200K and use the 85B filter to correct 5500K to 3200K. So you should use the "sun" switch when shooting a tungsten-balanced film (200T or 500T -- hence the "T" for tungsten-balance) outdoors in daylight or indoors in daylight-balanced light. Just note that since the old internal 85A filter is slightly less strong than the 85B filter, your images in daylight will be slightly cooler. However, since you are shooting negative stock and plan on doing a telecine transfer, you can add some more warmth easily enough in post. Or add a warming filter or use an external 85B filter instead of the "sun" switch.

Now when using 50D stock outdoors, since it is already daylight-balanced, leave it in "lightbulb" (i.e. it doesn't need the 85A filter that using the "sun" switch would flip in behind the lens internally.)
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#4 STIJN

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 04:38 PM

Since K40 and E160 were tungsten-balanced, the "sun" switch flips in an internal 85A orange filter for correcting 5500K daylight to 3400K tungsten, which is what these film stocks were balanced for (3400K photoflood illumination, i.e. "Type A" film.) The "lightbulb" switch actually just means no filter.

Modern tungsten-balanced stocks are actually balanced for 3200K and use the 85B filter to correct 5500K to 3200K. So you should use the "sun" switch when shooting a tungsten-balanced film (200T or 500T -- hence the "T" for tungsten-balance) outdoors in daylight or indoors in daylight-balanced light. Just note that since the old internal 85A filter is slightly less strong than the 85B filter, your images in daylight will be slightly cooler. However, since you are shooting negative stock and plan on doing a telecine transfer, you can add some more warmth easily enough in post. Or add a warming filter or use an external 85B filter instead of the "sun" switch.

Now when using 50D stock outdoors, since it is already daylight-balanced, leave it in "lightbulb" (i.e. it doesn't need the 85A filter that using the "sun" switch would flip in behind the lens internally.)

David, thanks a lot for your clear, consize and NON-JUDGEMENTAL answer... I really appreciate it!!!

David, thanks a lot for your clear, consize and NON-JUDGEMENTAL answer... I really appreciate it!!! :)
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#5 santo

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 04:41 PM

Is there a script?
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#6 STIJN

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 04:46 PM

:lol: And I haven't tested the camera yet!!! But you know what: I'LL BE JUST FINE!

you're shooting a feature and you're using stocks you've never used before in a camera you don't quite know how to operate? anyway, to answer the question we need to know what light you're shooting in. i'd probably leave the knob in the bulb position and use external filters as appropriate.

/matt



Is there a script? :angry: What is your problem, dude?



:) What a guy. Thanks again man!

Since K40 and E160 were tungsten-balanced, the "sun" switch flips in an internal 85A orange filter for correcting 5500K daylight to 3400K tungsten, which is what these film stocks were balanced for (3400K photoflood illumination, i.e. "Type A" film.) The "lightbulb" switch actually just means no filter.

Modern tungsten-balanced stocks are actually balanced for 3200K and use the 85B filter to correct 5500K to 3200K. So you should use the "sun" switch when shooting a tungsten-balanced film (200T or 500T -- hence the "T" for tungsten-balance) outdoors in daylight or indoors in daylight-balanced light. Just note that since the old internal 85A filter is slightly less strong than the 85B filter, your images in daylight will be slightly cooler. However, since you are shooting negative stock and plan on doing a telecine transfer, you can add some more warmth easily enough in post. Or add a warming filter or use an external 85B filter instead of the "sun" switch.

Now when using 50D stock outdoors, since it is already daylight-balanced, leave it in "lightbulb" (i.e. it doesn't need the 85A filter that using the "sun" switch would flip in behind the lens internally.)


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#7 santo

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 04:49 PM

That's a fair question, I think. You're rushing into making an entire feature length film, not knowing even if your camera works or how the filmstock will look, so you're obviously pretty impulsive and not into planning things out and prefer to throw the dice with thousands of dollars and other people's sincere efforts on the line. You like to gamble. Is it an improvised feature?
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#8 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 04:58 PM

judgemental? i was a little sceptical and thus asked you a question, which in my opinion was the best advice i could give you. surely you understand that it's not common practice to shoot features with this little preparation? (well actually it might be pretty much common practice in the indie world but it's still generally not the best way) ;-)

and in case you didn't notice i did answer your specific question as well. for which you're welcome. let us know if you need any further help.

/matt
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#9 STIJN

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 05:24 PM

Yes, it is improvised, and yes I have the money to throw away... Let me go ahead and finish my script while you spend your time talking down to people... I bet that you're a very prolific director!
That's a fair question, I think. You're rushing into making an entire feature length film, not knowing even if your camera works or how the filmstock will look, so you're obviously pretty impulsive and not into planning things out and prefer to throw the dice with thousands of dollars and other people's sincere efforts on the line. You like to gamble. Is it an improvised feature?
[/quote]


[/quote]
Yes, it is improvised, and yes I have the money to throw away... Let me go ahead and finish my script while you spend your time talking down to people... I bet that you're a very prolific director!
That's a fair question, I think. You're rushing into making an entire feature length film, not knowing even if your camera works or how the filmstock will look, so you're obviously pretty impulsive and not into planning things out and prefer to throw the dice with thousands of dollars and other people's sincere efforts on the line. You like to gamble. Is it an improvised feature?
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#10 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 05:38 PM

this is just so sad i feel like crying. so where do we all go now that the small gauge trolls found this board too?

/matt
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#11 etimh

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 07:05 PM

this is just so sad i feel like crying. so where do we all go now that the small gauge trolls found this board too?

/matt


Why don't you and Santo go off and play somewhere together?

Tim
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#12 STIJN

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 10:10 PM

Why don't you and Santo go off and play somewhere together?

Tim

Sorry guys... I shouldn't have answered. Not worth my time. Thanks for the help MATT and DAVID!...
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#13 John Hyde

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 11:47 PM

STIJN,

Use caution with a company like Pro8mm. You have Yale and Spectra as better alternatives for customer service and quality.

Should you wish to use another lab, Spectra will process Pro8mm film for free when you telecine it with them.

Spectra

Yale

Good luck!
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#14 STIJN

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 01:50 AM

STIJN,

Use caution with a company like Pro8mm. You have Yale and Spectra as better alternatives for customer service and quality.

Should you wish to use another lab, Spectra will process Pro8mm film for free when you telecine it with them.

Spectra

Yale

Good luck!

Thanks bud! Yes, they are RATS. I have had some bad experiences with them (like getting slammed w/some pretty ridiculous fees... But we purchased 120 rolls w/ processing a couple of months ago... Let's give them another chance, but please tell me more about Spectra...

this is just so sad i feel like crying. so where do we all go now that the small gauge trolls found this board too?

/matt

Cry Ingmar... Cry!
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#15 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 03:20 AM

STIJN

I sense that you just want your questions answered and leave the judging at the door. It would be cool to read down the road that you had success with your project, but your original call for help really exposed you as someone who should make a short super-8 film first before attempting a longer project. Perhaps just shoot one scene from your movie as a "short" and then go through all the post steps before attempting to do the whole project.

Also, I would never consider doing a Super-8 feature with only one camera. I'd want at least 2-3 cameras of the exact same make and model so I can switch out at a moments notice if necessary, and I'd also have available other cameras that may cater to specific shooting situations.

Are you the director and DP on this project?
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