Jump to content


Photo

Using "black" light


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Fernando Getz

Fernando Getz
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Sao Paulo, brasil

Posted 16 November 2005 - 09:15 PM

I need to shoot a black light scene the same type you see at clubs where white and neon style colors pop out and everything else is dark. I was told that I could use a rosco "congo blue" gel to achieve that effect and even that there are 5500K Kino bulbs that can do it too. Has someone ever done this? My other option is to just get a black lightbulb, but I'd like to have more control over it.

Edited by DesPa, 16 November 2005 - 09:18 PM.

  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 16 November 2005 - 10:05 PM

Congo Blue will simulate that deep purple-blue cast that blacklight can create, but it creates no blacklight (UV) effect on colors or whites. Neither will a 5500K Kino tube (which is just daylight, not that blue -- you probably are thinking of a "super blue" Kino, the type used for lighting bluescreen shots.)

To get certain colors and whites to glow (like teeth), you need to use real UV light. Common blacklight tubes are too dim for moviemaking purposes unless they are really close to the object and you use a bank of tubes. Usually a movie will rent powerful UV lamps from a company called "Wildfire".

I did a blacklight scene years ago for a student film using 500 ASA film shot wide-open on a Super-Speed lens, and some ordinary fluorescent blacklight tubes bunched together and held really close to the actors. I augmented this with some normal lights gelled super blue (like with Congo Blue) to get some exposure on the faces. But you don't want that fake blacklight to overpower the real blacklight, so keep the super-blue lighting really dim.

Edited by David Mullen, 16 November 2005 - 10:06 PM.

  • 0

#3 Bob Hayes

Bob Hayes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1087 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Culver City, California

Posted 17 November 2005 - 02:17 AM

I?ve had pretty good luck with black lighting buy just buying cheap Halloween style 4? black lights. I use them to create night skylines on set pieces. I use 4? x 2 tube lights and keep them about 5? from the black light paint. At 200 ASA they read great. For larger more controlled situations I use ?Wildfire? http://www.wildfirefx.com/ black lights. Congo blue won?t work.
  • 0

#4 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11936 posts
  • Other

Posted 17 November 2005 - 11:25 AM

Hi,

I have seen fluorescent effects under HMI light with congo blue filtration, probably because the HMIs put out an enormous amount of longwave UV anyway, and all the gel's doing is making the effect visible by losing much of the visible glare of the lamp.

There are tons of companies other than Wildfire who make UV cannon, although most of them are mercury vapour lamps which will not be flicker free.

Phil
  • 0

#5 Fernando Getz

Fernando Getz
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Sao Paulo, brasil

Posted 28 November 2005 - 08:04 AM

So I finally, ended up using this black light bulbs for Kinos. I'm not exactly sure about the name, but they worked like a charm. They're skinnier than a regular Kino Bulb and they are true UV. The shining teeth effect was perfect. I also tested the rosco congo blue filter but that didn't do the trick. I guess that would fake it if you were to shoot a club scene or something were you're mixing light sources, I was doing product shot so I needed the real thing, I did use some Dedo's with Full CTB + Congo Blue (I know, almost no output) but just enough for some edge lights. Thanks everybody for your suggestions.
  • 0

#6 Mike McLaughlin

Mike McLaughlin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:39 PM

So I finally, ended up using this black light bulbs for Kinos. I'm not exactly sure about the name, but they worked like a charm. They're skinnier than a regular Kino Bulb and they are true UV. The shining teeth effect was perfect. I also tested the rosco congo blue filter but that didn't do the trick. I guess that would fake it if you were to shoot a club scene or something were you're mixing light sources, I was doing product shot so I needed the real thing, I did use some Dedo's with Full CTB + Congo Blue (I know, almost no output) but just enough for some edge lights. Thanks everybody for your suggestions.



Do you know what they were called?
  • 0

#7 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:51 PM

.... although most of them are mercury vapour lamps which will not be flicker free.


Perhaps you could use long-decay paints to smooth out the flicker? Certainly worth a test.



-- J.S.
  • 0

#8 Toy Spears

Toy Spears

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Director

Posted 25 November 2009 - 10:16 AM

hey do you have a link to what you shot?
  • 0


Opal

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Willys Widgets

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc