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Getting Processing done in the UK


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#1 Robert Edge

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 02:29 PM

I'm going to be in England (London, Cambridge, Cowes) from about December 15 through New Years. Could someone recommend a lab for super 16 Kodak Vision 2 processing in London? Are there recommendable labs in Cambridge or Southampton?

One other question. It might be somewhat cheaper and more convenient to wait and have the film processed in New York the first week of January. If I do that, am I risking anything in terms of image quality?

Thanks.
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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 02:47 PM

Try Technicolor in London. They have a Drop off/Collection office on Berwick Street, Soho. The phone number is 0208 759 5432 from the UK. I've always found them to be reliable and affordable.
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#3 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 03:29 PM

Unless your a good swimmer, traveling with unprocessed film from one developed country to another one is not a good idea since 9/11. Once processed, no X-ray inspection will be able to harm your image.

Some inspectors have even insisted on visually seeing that there is real film inside the can.

I would buy my stock locally from a reputable source and have it processed at a local lab. Many times cheaper than having to reshoot the lot because of X-ray damage.

If you shoot in darkest Africa, then it is another matter.
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#4 Robert Edge

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 03:30 PM

Stuart, thanks. I don't suppose you've had any experience with Ice Film as a rental house? I don't doubt that they're good, but I'm wondering whether they are a good choice if you aren't going to be a big client.

Dirk, I've gone through an awful lot of airport screenings with unprocessed film and I haven't had a single problem with fogging. At the film speeds I have in mind, I'm not worried about screening, just whether motion picture film is trickier than still film if processing is delayed two or three weeks.
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 03:51 PM

Dirk, I've gone through an awful lot of airport screenings with unprocessed film and I haven't had a single problem with fogging. At the film speeds I have in mind, I'm not worried about screening, just whether motion picture film is trickier than still film if processing is delayed two or three weeks.


I agree with Dirk --- avoid subjecting unprocessed film to ANY x-ray inspection. NEVER put unprocessed film in checked baggage, as most will be subjected to HIGH INTENSITY x-ray scanning. Even the low dose x-ray machines used for carry-on parcels can have a cumulative effect if multiple scans are done. If you have to carry unprocessed film on a plane, leave enough time for hand-inspection in a changing bag (that you need to provide), or ship the film with proper documentation and labeling on with an air freight carrier.

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.11.10&lc=en

Here is what scanner fog looks like:

Posted Image
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#6 Robert Edge

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 04:02 PM

John,

I understand your point that baggage scanners will fog film and that carry-on scanners can fog film after multiple scans (the number I usually hear is five). With Kodak still film (colour reversal, colour negative and black and white), I have put film through carry-on scanners as many as three times without any problem whatsoever. On this trip to the UK, I would expect one or at most two scans.

My experience with Kodak film is in accordance with the following statement from your website:

"Carry-on baggage inspection conveyors using low intensity x-rays, used at security checkpoints in US airports, usually do not affect film. However, these machines may now be supplemented in some cases by high intensity machines that will fog all unprocessed film. Travelers should be wary of all scanners at foreign airports."

I've allowed security people at British, Irish, French, Israeli, Canadian, New Zealand and US airports to scan film at ASA 400 or lower without incident.

Is there a reason to believe that Kodak Vision 2 film is more sensitive to fogging from carry-on scanners than your still film? If so, I'll ask for a hand-inspection, but I'd rather not unless it is necessary, because it is a hassle.
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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 05:21 PM

John,

I understand your point that baggage scanners will fog film and that carry-on scanners can fog film after multiple scans (the number I usually hear is five). With Kodak still film (colour reversal, colour negative and black and white), I have put film through carry-on scanners as many as three times without any problem whatsoever. On this trip to the UK, I would expect one or at most two scans.

My experience with Kodak film is in accordance with the following statement from your website:

"Carry-on baggage inspection conveyors using low intensity x-rays, used at security checkpoints in US airports, usually do not affect film. However, these machines may now be supplemented in some cases by high intensity machines that will fog all unprocessed film. Travelers should be wary of all scanners at foreign airports."

I've allowed security people at British, Irish, French, Israeli, Canadian, New Zealand and US airports to scan film at ASA 400 or lower without incident.

Is there a reason to believe that Kodak Vision 2 film is more sensitive to fogging from carry-on scanners than your still film? If so, I'll ask for a hand-inspection, but I'd rather not unless it is necessary, because it is a hassle.


Compared to still film, motion picture film is usually more sensitive, as a tungsten balance film has a faster (more sensitive to x-rays) blue layer than equivalent daylight balance still films. Also, any fogging or non-uniformity is more obvious because you are looking at sequential frames, so there can be flicker or moving "curtains" of fog exposure.

Avoid X-rays if you can. Even the USA Transportation Security Administration specifically allows hand inspection for ALL motion picture film products, regardless of Exposure Index.
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#8 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 05:30 PM

Stuart, thanks. I don't suppose you've had any experience with Ice Film as a rental house? I don't doubt that they're good, but I'm wondering whether they are a good choice if you aren't going to be a big client.


I don't have any direct dealings with ICE, but I know that they are the Aaton main dealer for the UK, and they have a very good rep. As you're going to be in and around London, you could try Panavision in Greenford, or Joe Dunton & Co a bit further out in Hertfordshire.
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#9 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 05:55 PM

ICE have been great - not that I have used them much

thanks

Rolfe
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#10 Dominic Case

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 08:02 PM

Still film is actually less of a problem, because any slight fluctuation in fog levels along the length of a few frames (or a turn of film on the roll) shows up in motion picture, where it might not be noticeable in a still.

It's very simple logic that if you can get local processing that you can rely on, you should get it. Completely avoids any risk of X-ray.

Not sure if Technicolor still process 16mm. I know DeLuxe don't. But there are several other labs in the UK that are totally reliable. Mostly based in London - or in the north - forget Southampton or Cambridge.

Consider Bucks in Slough - not far from Heathrow; Soho Images in London; Film & Photo Ltd in West London, or Todd-AO among others.

Sorry if this leaves any lab out.
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#11 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 04:51 AM

Hi,

Rushes exist... but they seemed to have a very long turnaround for small quantities of 16, and didn't want to do our clip tests.

Phil
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#12 Stephen Williams

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 05:18 AM

Hi,

ICE is an Aaton dealer, so should be able to help you out with any accessories you need.
I've used Soho Images in the past for neg development, they were very good.

Stephen
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#13 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 07:42 AM

I would recommend Technicolor too, and seconds the recommandation to process there, don't bring exposed and not processed film but if you have not any other choice, in any case !

John, thanks for the posts of fogged film, very nice !
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#14 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 01:52 PM

John, thanks for the posts of fogged film, very nice !


Unfortunately, not "very nice" if it happens to your film. :(

The air freight carriers are usually very helpful in arranging to ship film without subjecting it to x-rays, especially for "known shippers". But if the film ends up in the cargo hold of a PASSENGER airplane (checked baggage), it will likely get scanned.

So, NEVER put unprocessed film in CHECKED baggage. Ask for hand inspection (in a changing bag you provide) of film in carry-on baggage. Pre-arrange for hand-inspection, and be sure there is time enough to have it done. Even low-dose machines used for carry-on baggage can fog film, especially with multiple passes through the machine. Magnetometers (walk-through or wands), chemical "sniffers" and animal "sniffers" (e.g., dogs) are safe for unopened film cans.

Most air freight shippers (FedEx, DHL, UPS, etc.) can work with you on shipping film safely with proper documentation and labeling.

When possible, buy film locally (Kodak has offices throughout the world) and process locally, without having to carry film on a plane.
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#15 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 02:56 PM

Technicolor do still process 16mm, and I've found them to be cheaper than Soho Images.

have fun...
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#16 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 04:11 PM

Unfortunately, not "very nice" if it happens to your film. :(


I knew I was sort of making a two senses sentence here, and I know the feeling one can have looking at these samples, but, honestly, on the technical only point of view, they are of a great interest, firts time I see such samples !
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