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35mm Kodachrome in lengths suitable for cinematography?


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#1 Henri Titchen

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 04:02 PM

Hi,

Is it possible to buy 35mm Kodachrome in lengths suitable for cinematography?

I'm only looking for small quantities.

(I have found a lab that can process it.)

Thanks From,
Henry.
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 04:32 PM

Hi,

Is it possible to buy 35mm Kodachrome in lengths suitable for cinematography?

I'm only looking for small quantities.

(I have found a lab that can process it.)

Thanks From,
Henry.


It's not likely. At the very least, a rather large minimum quantity would be required, since the perforations are different. Have you considered KODAK EKTACHROME 100D Color Reversal Camera Film 5285/7285, which is a stocked item and has more labs that process it?

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.4.6.4&lc=en


KODAK EKTACHROME 100D - 5285/7285
Technical Data
Processing Information
FAQ's
Questions and Comments about EKTACHROME 100D
Intense saturation + true 100 speed


Now you have a 100-speed color reversal motion picture film designed for daylight. Whether you're shooting ads, music videos, documentaries, television, or features, it delivers intensely saturated color, plus a neutral gray scale and accurate skin tones. All with a sharpness you won't find in any other 100-speed reversal film.


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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 09:59 PM

Hi,

Is it possible to buy 35mm Kodachrome in lengths suitable for cinematography?

I'm only looking for small quantities.

(I have found a lab that can process it.)

Thanks From,
Henry.



You can still get it in 16mm single perf, if that would suit your needs.


chris
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#4 Henri Titchen

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 01:50 AM

Hi,

I was thinking of using this film in an Arri 2A/B/C so I don't think that the different perforations would make any difference.

I am attracted to Kodachrome as it has colours that I like and it has an archival reputation that is superior to other colour film.

Now I just have to find some practical lengths :-)

Henry.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 02:34 AM

Properly stored current color negative film should last over 100 years before it even STARTS to fade, so I'm not sure that you really need to worry about archivability compared to Kodachrome.

Also, if you're shooting 35mm Kodachrome for making 35mm prints, you'll lose its unique color quality in the process of making an IP and IN -- using an optical printer just so your emulsion is on the correct side for making prints off of the IN. You lose some color saturation from making these dupes, plus you gain contrast, and any methods of reducing the contrast of the dupe (like flashing) further mutes the colors.

And if you're shooting Kodachrome for telecine transfer only or a DI, then you can, instead, shoot color negative and play with the colors to create a Kodachrome feeling.

Not exactly the same thing, but honestly, the ONLY way to see the "true" colors of Kodachrome is to project the original, because any duping, telecine transfer, or scanning, etc. will alter or transform the colors.

I believe Robert Richardson shot some 35mm Kodachrome for "Kill Bill" (the Chinese training flashback) so he must have had a special order run with the correct perfs. Don't know how he got that much footage processed. He duped it a couple of generations to make it look like a print of an old Hong Kong movie from the 1970's.

It would be easier to deal with 5285, Ektachrome 100D, which is also very saturated, even more than Kodachrome is.
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#6 A.Oliver

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 06:19 AM

I doubt if 5285 is as sharp of kodachrome. Certainly 7285 does not appear to be as sharp as 16mm kodachrome when projected. I put my money on kodachrome as being more fade resistant than any modern neg stock.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 10:02 AM

I doubt if 5285 is as sharp of kodachrome. Certainly 7285 does not appear to be as sharp as 16mm kodachrome when projected. I put my money on kodachrome as being more fade resistant than any modern neg stock.


Sure, but if you're talking well over 100 years for fading to begin in the first color layer even on modern color negative, and something like 500 years for complete fading (all assuming proper storage in a vault) then I don't think it is a real issue.

Besides, if you are THAT paranoid, just make b&w separations for archiving.

And I suspect that 5285 is as sharp if not sharper than Kodachrome. Besides, he was asking about shooting in 35mm -- do you really think that 5285 isn't sharp enough in 35mm?

Edited by David Mullen, 23 November 2005 - 10:03 AM.

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#8 Sam Wells

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 10:24 AM

I doubt if 5285 is as sharp of kodachrome. Certainly 7285 does not appear to be as sharp as 16mm kodachrome when projected. I put my money on kodachrome as being more fade resistant than any modern neg stock.


It's a tossup I guess.

Well we *know* what the long term stability of Kodachrome is. We have evidence about the color negs.

I have Koda cam originals and Koda 7387 prints that are 25 years old which aren't 'stored' at all and look *identical* to the way they did 1/4 century ago.

The now discontiunued 7399 did a remarkably good job (given a good lab like Forde) of preseving most aspects of the look of Kodachrome original.

Printed via 72/2272 IN onto Vision stock gives a look that does not look like a Kodachrome orig but doesn't quite look like anything else either....

Very cool (as in cool not opposed to warm !) if in fact if that's what you want.... but it's a thing unto itself.

-Sam
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#9 A.Oliver

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 02:15 PM

Sure, but if you're talking well over 100 years for fading to begin in the first color layer even on modern color negative, and something like 500 years for complete fading (all assuming proper storage in a vault) then I don't think it is a real issue.

Besides, if you are THAT paranoid, just make b&w separations for archiving.

And I suspect that 5285 is as sharp if not sharper than Kodachrome. Besides, he was asking about shooting in 35mm -- do you really think that 5285 isn't sharp enough in 35mm?

I admit i have not used 5285, but in terms of 16mm, i found even 16mm k40 appears to be sharper than 7285. As far as 35mm, two options, k64 or k200. I think k64 would a far better performer than 5285, plus k64 wont have the 5285 circus chrome look.
Andy
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#10 Sam Wells

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 04:49 PM

I don't have a direct comparison with E100VS but I have C prints here from Velvia and K64 I shot.

I'd say the Velvia is a bit sharper, but the higher contrast & saturation emphasises that.

I don't think sharpness is any kind of problem with either stock or E100VS/5285 !

Viability of this effort in 35mm IS another thing...

-Sam
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