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#1 jijhh

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 01:09 AM

I'm shooting a 16mm project that has a few shots in a bar and I could use some lighting tips. I'm working with a 1k fresnel, 2 650k fresnels, and a little inky. I'm looking for just a very straightforward bar at night look and basically I just wanted to get some opinions on a good stock (color neg) to shoot and what sort of lighting will give me the realistic bar look. I understand that there are millions of combinations and artistic choices, but I've never shot in this sort of situation before and am looking for some ideas that will give me a good result.

Andrew
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#2 Tomas Koolhaas

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 02:30 AM

I'm shooting a 16mm project that has a few shots in a bar and I could use some lighting tips. I'm working with a 1k fresnel, 2 650k fresnels, and a little inky. I'm looking for just a very straightforward bar at night look and basically I just wanted to get some opinions on a good stock (color neg) to shoot and what sort of lighting will give me the realistic bar look. I understand that there are millions of combinations and artistic choices, but I've never shot in this sort of situation before and am looking for some ideas that will give me a good result.

Andrew


Hi,
For some reason it seems almost every film I have shot has a bar at night scene in it, my reel is starting to look like an advertisement for alchoholism. Every time I have shot a bar I have found that multiple smaller sources hidden around the bar look better than fewer large sources, even though I usually try to avoid having too many competeing sources in a scene, perhaps this is because bars in reality usually do have numerous little spotlights or candles or lamps on tables etc.. It also depends what KIND of bar it is. I have always been wanting a semi-romantic warm kind of bar lighting, I have never shot a seedy bar scene. Obviously the two would have very different lighting: The warm nice bar may have very soft warm coloured flickereing candle light whereas the seedy bar may have very sickly green flourescent fixtures! I would love to add some stills of my bar lighting but for some reason I cannot attach even the smallest files to any posts (this has been happening for about two weeks now!) but I would suggest shooting on 7218 (Kodak 500T vision2) as it has the best lattitude of any stock I've used, and will allow you to underexpose some areas a bit if you don't have enough light. Also get some small bulbs and sockets, and some small kinos if you can, these can be hidden anywhere and create nice "pools" of light.
Cheers.
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#3 Sol Train Saihati

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 05:00 AM

I have shot in many bars in london using almost entirely natural light, often just wacking in a china ball to supplement it. Mind you, only the posh ones are usually well lit enough to get away with this. Like Tomaas mentioned, it really depends on the type of scene it is and its place in the story of your film, as well as how this scene fits into your movie overall. These considerations will empower you to narrow down your approach and subsequently allow us to offer a little more advice. As far as film stock goes 500T is a good choice and will allow your to shoot in low light situations with some fast primes, but may look a bit grainy without a decent grade. Hit your potential locations and have a walk around with a light meter too. You may find that it will make a lot of decisions for you. :huh:
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#4 Tomas Koolhaas

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 02:56 PM

I have shot in many bars in london using almost entirely natural light, often just wacking in a china ball to supplement it. Mind you, only the posh ones are usually well lit enough to get away with this. Like Tomaas mentioned, it really depends on the type of scene it is and its place in the story of your film, as well as how this scene fits into your movie overall. These considerations will empower you to narrow down your approach and subsequently allow us to offer a little more advice. As far as film stock goes 500T is a good choice and will allow your to shoot in low light situations with some fast primes, but may look a bit grainy without a decent grade. Hit your potential locations and have a walk around with a light meter too. You may find that it will make a lot of decisions for you. :huh:


Hi,
Excellent advice Mr. Dumpy, I always go and Pre-scout locations with my light meter just to see what I'm gonna be working with! not many people seem to do it but it is vital for me! Also china balls are a perfect source for bars, thats why I suggested getting a bunch of bulbs and sockets so you can hide them and also use them in conjunction with china balls. I actually did this with the stills I wanted to post (is anyone else having this problem recently- it says 0 bytes of global space for attachments without me having attached anything yet?). 500T is a bit grainy by nature (especially on 16mm), however, 7218 (Vis2) is one of the least grainy stocks I have ever used (especially for a 500 speed stock) I used it on S16 and people thought it was 35mm because the grain was so tight, and when I used it on 35mm I pushed it a stop and it still had no visible grain at all.
Cheers.
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#5 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 10:34 AM

Tomas and dj made very good points. i would definetley take my gaffer and/or key grip with me and scout the location. Take light reading and see where I would need to set up my lights. I would probally take the 1k and make it a soft source by shooting it through a silk or bouncing it. I would just use the other lights as fill or for some background and depth within a shot.
Hope this helps
Mario C. Jackson
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 05:45 PM

I'm shooting a 16mm project that has a few shots in a bar and I could use some lighting tips. I'm working with a 1k fresnel, 2 650k fresnels, and a little inky. I'm looking for just a very straightforward bar at night look and basically I just wanted to get some opinions on a good stock (color neg) to shoot and what sort of lighting will give me the realistic bar look.


Bars and nightclubs are the perfect opportunity to go as crazy as you want with the lighting, because the "real" light in those places is multi-colored and comes from all directions. About the only thing you can do wrong is overlight it, and wash out the low-key look.

You may be limited with the number of movie lights you have, but don't let that stop you from adding other kinds of lights to the location. Youy can use all kinds of hardware store lights and home-made fixtures in a location like this. For example, it's not uncommon to place a 4' fluorescent tube under the bar as a soft uplight on the bartender. You can use other simple clip-on lights with colored party bulbs to accent the walls and textures in the background, then use your movies lights to more strategically model your actors.
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Visual Products

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