Jump to content


Photo

In camera special effect


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Anthony Powell

Anthony Powell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 November 2005 - 07:05 AM

Does anyone have any ideas on a situation I have been confronted with on a film that is due to be shot on Super 16mm with a Bolex EBM?

Their is a scene where a beam of light is to shine through a crack in a wall and transfix an old man who is caught in it's beam. The effect that the director wants to achieve from either as neutral angle, or from the side, is that the beam of light should appear to have an almost 'material' quality to it, and that instead of just instantly enveloping the old man who is in it's path (as say a torch would when switched on and pointed at something), it should appear to advance slowly towards him.
Been scratching my head about this for some weeks so any help / insight would be greatly appreciated. Must stress though, that this effect must be achieved IN CAMERA if possible.
Thanks...
  • 0

#2 Peter J DeCrescenzo

Peter J DeCrescenzo
  • Sustaining Members
  • 620 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Portland, OR, USA www.peterdv.com Blog: http://herefortheweather.wordpress.com/

Posted 21 November 2005 - 11:27 AM

... Their is a scene where a beam of light is to shine through a crack in a wall and transfix an old man who is caught in it's beam. ... either as neutral angle, or from the side, is that the beam of light should appear to have an almost 'material' quality to it, and that instead of just instantly enveloping the old man who is in it's path ... it should appear to advance slowly towards him. ...


Would smoking the set and using a fresnel instrument with a snoot on it work? (The output of this light would depend on the ambient light level on the set.)

Or is there another light source which is better than a fresnel for casting a beam of light through smoke?

Also, would a shining the light through a relatively small hole punched in opaque material (such as a sheet of black foamcore) produce a better-defined beam of light compared to using a snoot?

(I'm asking, I don't know the answer.)

- Peter DeCrescenzo

Edited by Peter DeCrescenzo, 21 November 2005 - 11:48 AM.

  • 0

#3 Matt Irwin

Matt Irwin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 389 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 21 November 2005 - 01:30 PM

Does the source of the light beam have to be seen in the frame at any point?

A beam projector or a leko (maybe a VNSP par?) would be better for a beam than a fresnel, methinks. If the source is out of frame, a piece of foamcore with a hole should work. You'd just have to move the light parallel to the sheet of foamcore and pan the light to keep it on the hole.
  • 0

#4 Leo Anthony Vale

Leo Anthony Vale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2010 posts
  • Other
  • Pittsburgh PA

Posted 21 November 2005 - 05:13 PM

Does anyone have any ideas on a situation I have been confronted with on a film that is due to be shot on Super 16mm with a Bolex EBM?

Their is a scene where a beam of light is to shine through a crack in a wall and transfix an old man who is caught in it's beam. The effect that the director wants to achieve from either as neutral angle, or from the side, is that the beam of light should appear to have an almost 'material' quality to it, and that instead of just instantly enveloping the old man who is in it's path (as say a torch would when switched on and pointed at something), it should appear to advance slowly towards him.
Been scratching my head about this for some weeks so any help / insight would be greatly appreciated. Must stress though, that this effect must be achieved IN CAMERA if possible.
Thanks...


---A beam splitter with artwork of the beam off to the side. The beam is 'wiped' on with a moving mask and effect lighting on man is brought up with a dimmer or cutter as beam 'hits' him.

---LV
  • 0

#5 Glenn Hanns

Glenn Hanns
  • Sustaining Members
  • 160 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 November 2005 - 05:25 PM

Does anyone have any ideas on a situation I have been confronted with on a film that is due to be shot on Super 16mm with a Bolex EBM?

Their is a scene where a beam of light is to shine through a crack in a wall and transfix an old man who is caught in it's beam. The effect that the director wants to achieve from either as neutral angle, or from the side, is that the beam of light should appear to have an almost 'material' quality to it, and that instead of just instantly enveloping the old man who is in it's path (as say a torch would when switched on and pointed at something), it should appear to advance slowly towards him.
Been scratching my head about this for some weeks so any help / insight would be greatly appreciated. Must stress though, that this effect must be achieved IN CAMERA if possible.
Thanks...



You could try a split image effect with a piece of glass at 45? to camera. Then with a beam of light setup off camera you could 'reveal' the beam as slowly as you wanted by having a piece of black cloth first cover up the effect and then slowly move out of the way. Very old trick but will work. Heres a pic.

Attached Images

  • Lightsetup.jpg

  • 0

#6 Anthony Powell

Anthony Powell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 22 November 2005 - 08:55 AM

Hi, thanks for your reply, could you elaborate?
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Visual Products

Opal

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Opal

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC