Jump to content


lighting a cinema


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 dtoulias

dtoulias
  • Guests

Posted 21 November 2005 - 09:28 AM

I need to light a cinema with people watching a film, set in the 40s. Any advice or tips on achieving the desired effect of a film being shown? Thank you.
  • 0

#2 Alex Haspel

Alex Haspel
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 282 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • vienna, austria

Posted 22 November 2005 - 03:38 PM

I need to light a cinema with people watching a film, set in the 40s. Any advice or tips on achieving the desired effect of a film being shown? Thank you.



well my first idea would be to have a beam from a very focused light source come from the projector room,
fitted with some home build 'shutter'... which could easily be made from a big fan maybe?

are you shooting film? if so, this idea would definately require some testing.
if it's video, just put the fan or whatever 'shutter' you build on a dimmer, and play around with it until it looks good.

however, i would then bounce that beam coming from behind back at the actor's faces, and probably also add a little steady fill (of the same softness),
so that they wont be completely dark when the light's shutter is closed.

it's just an idea.

i still hope i could help.

oh, and if you try this, you might also:
a.) get some of the beam's light on the back of the actors heads or
b.) if the above looks crappy because the beam is then too low, and extra light (which is of course hard, cause it should have the same shutter-rythm as the other one) on the back of the actors heads....

..for a little rim so they wont drown in the background (contrast-wise).

Edited by haspel, 22 November 2005 - 03:43 PM.

  • 0

#3 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 22 November 2005 - 07:15 PM

I need to light a cinema with people watching a film, set in the 40s. Any advice or tips on achieving the desired effect of a film being shown? Thank you.


Didn't we just do this? ;) We discussed this barely a month ago, and there's much, much more info in the archives.
  • 0

#4 Joe Lotuaco

Joe Lotuaco
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts
  • Grip

Posted 22 November 2005 - 09:20 PM

Also, in this month's AC, Roger Deakins, ASC, BSC goes into great detail about how he lit the scene where the soldiers watch a screening of Apocalypse Now in Jarhead.
  • 0

#5 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 22 November 2005 - 09:39 PM

Didn't we just do this? ;) We discussed this barely a month ago, and there's much, much more info in the archives.



Yeah, it's about a dozen posts down in this very forum. ;)
  • 0

#6 WesScharfglass

WesScharfglass

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Other

Posted 22 November 2005 - 11:54 PM

Also, in this month's AC, Roger Deakins, ASC, BSC goes into great detail about how he lit the scene where the soldiers watch a screening of Apocalypse Now in Jarhead.


Excuse me for my ignorance, but what exactly is AC? I'm assuming a publication but I'm not sure what the acronym means.
  • 0

#7 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 23 November 2005 - 12:17 AM

Excuse me for my ignorance, but what exactly is AC? I'm assuming a publication but I'm not sure what the acronym means.



American Cinematographer. It's a publication by the ASC (American Society of Cinematographers), which is an educational society for professional cinematographers. Membership is really a sign of excellence in professional filmmaking.
  • 0

#8 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 23 November 2005 - 04:25 PM

I need to light a cinema with people watching a film, set in the 40s.

FWIW, in the 1940's the audience would likely be watching a black and white film (unless it's supposed to be Gone With the Wind or The Wizard of Oz). So whatever light gag you create for reflectance from the screen should be monochrome, even perhaps slightly bluish to contrast against dimmed house lights.
  • 0

#9 Sol Train Saihati

Sol Train Saihati
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 96 posts
  • Gaffer
  • London

Posted 23 November 2005 - 06:05 PM

Watch Cinema Paradiso. Take a few days to process what you have just seen. Then try and watch it again with one eye on the cinematography(which isn't easy as you are bound to get caught up in the story again). A Masterclass on how to light a cinema. The last scene is simply breathtaking, pulls at the heartstrings of anyone working in this industry.
  • 0


Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Opal

Visual Products