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Macro to 50mm can it be done?


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#1 Allyn Laing

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 09:31 AM

I have an obscure shot in mind and I wonder if it can be done?

The shot starts as a macro of the pupil(Black fills the entire screen) in an eye then moves out to reveal the person in a Mid. Is there a lens system that can do this or is it a combination of lenses?

Does the frazier lens system give this effect?

regards,

Allyn
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 09:44 AM

I have an obscure shot in mind and I wonder if it can be done?

The shot starts as a macro of the pupil(Black fills the entire screen) in an eye then moves out to reveal the person in a Mid. Is there a lens system that can do this or is it a combination of lenses?

Does the frazier lens system give this effect?

regards,

Allyn


Hi,

A motion control could help. Its easier in S16 than 35mm as you wouldl be closer than 1:1 in 35. Usually these shots need help in post, from zooming in, in telecine to a 3d take over

Stephen
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#3 Allyn Laing

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 09:55 AM

Hi,

A motion control could help. Its easier in S16 than 35mm as you wouldl be closer than 1:1 in 35. Usually these shots need help in post, from zooming in, in telecine to a 3d take over

Stephen


thanks stephen I'm planning to shoot in S16? I'm also unsure of what ratio to use what difference does 2.5:1 compared to 1:1?

Allyn.
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 10:44 AM

thanks stephen I'm planning to shoot in S16? I'm also unsure of what ratio to use what difference does 2.5:1 compared to 1:1?

Allyn.


Hi,

As the negative area of a S16 (235:1?) is smaller then its slightly easier to shoot at the 1:1 point happens earlier. It will be a pig to shoot as you will have almost zero DOF even at T8 and you will have to light to a T16 because of macro light loss. Follow focus will be fun! I don't think you will manage to get as close as you want. The eye full screen is going to be enough fun!

Stephen
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 11:59 AM

1.66:1, I believe


Yes full screen is 1.66:1 but Allyn mentioned 2.5:1 so I was assuming 2.35:1 would be the framing!
S16 2.35:1 uses less negative than S16 166:1 so 1:1 on 2.35:1 is a smaller area of the eye!
It's possible but problamatical to go through 1:1

Stephen
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#6 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 04:57 PM

I'd say no, actually. Not for framing, but for light, focus and reflections. Just shooting an iris or pupil locked off is a complete nightmare. When you're that close to the eye, there's no way to get a light in except use maybe ring lights. And when you pull back, so does the light and the exposure. And if you try to use some other light, the lens will block it.

You can always try, but I've never managed to pull it off yet.
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#7 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 04:47 AM

you can try shoot in reverse - start wide and go tight - switching from room lights to a ringlight - both on dimmers

thanks

Rolfe
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#8 Oli Soravia

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 06:27 PM

One alternative to realize this kind of a shot: The first rule in shooting an eye so close is to fix the actors head in order that it doesn`t move anymore. Regarding the lighting you can put the actor in a bounce box = right and left sides, bottom and background are completly closed by white cards. The one light you need comes from above through a diffusion frame (which is placed as a closing top frame). There must be a small hole in the the white card just in front of the actors face where the lens will be hided (usually a macro lens - no matter which aspect ratio you`re going to shoot). You will get a closeup from the eye - not from the pupil itself - then it`s possible to pull backwards by dolly track. Additionaly there must be made a prop - eye (a model eye larger than reality, by the prop department) it`s there where you start to shoot directly in the pupil and to pull back. Both shots are going to be composited later in post. Sure that the lighting of the prop eye has to be the same as the other one. I did that shot several times and also on different formats and it always worked for me. Hope that my english was good enough. Good luck.
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#9 boy yniguez

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 10:11 AM

[try the innovision probe lens system. it was designed purposely for close quarters photography and the lens barrels are barely over an inch in diameter giving you space to light around.
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