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Why on earth does David Lynch still shoot w/the PD-150


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#1 Steven C. Boone

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 10:14 PM

for some of his projects when there are now comparable cameras in that class that feature 24p?

His short "Darkened Room" looks like porn, not because of the content but because of the drab dv look.

Now he's doing "Inland Empire" with either the 150 or 170, not sure. Even no-budget 'hood movies are turning up with gorgeous images made by the DVX-100A or the XL2. Why shoot ugly?
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#2 Bryan Darling

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 01:51 AM

Because it to is an aesthetic.
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#3 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 06:33 AM

Why shoot ugly?

I guess one man's ugly is another man's beauty. Although, personally I don't think shooting a feature on SD video is a great idea no matter what format, so it's all "ugly" to me. He's a smart enough guy to know what he wants though, and I'm sure he chose the proper format for what he wanted.
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#4 Jason Debus

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 12:46 PM

Here's some of the quotes from David Lynch on the matter. Personally I think he's sick of companies owning his work. With his web site (and working with DV) he's found that he can be a different kind of director AND own his own work.

"It's about a woman in trouble, and it's a mystery, and that's about all I want to say about it."

"Making a film is a beautiful mystery. You go deep into the wood, and you don't want to come out of that wood, but the time is coming very soon when I will have to."

"I started working in DV for my Web site, and I fell in love with the medium. It's unbelievable, the freedom and the incredible different possibilities it affords, in shooting and in post-production."

"For me, there's no way back to film. I'm done with it. I love abstraction. Film is a beautiful medium, but it's very slow and you don't get a chance to try a lot of different things. With DV, you get those chances. And in post-production, if you can think it, you can do it."

"I'm writing as I go. I believe in the unity of things. When you have one part, and then a second part that doesn't relate to that first part, it's very curious to find that they do relate after all. It's a most beautiful thing."

"When you run out of film, you have to stop and reload, and during that time the heat sometimes goes off. But with this medium you can keep that heat, and it builds, and it's beautiful to see."

"[Laura Dern is] the most incredible actress. Some people get roles and do their thing, but some have a lot more inside and don't usually get the chance to show it."

"[The quality of the DV image] looks different. Some would say it looks bad. But it reminds me of early 35mm, that didn't have that tight grain. When you have a poor image, there's lots more room to dream."

"But I've done tests transferring DV to film, and there are all kinds of controls to dial in the look you want."


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#5 Steven C. Boone

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 12:55 PM

Here's some of the quotes from David Lynch on the matter. Personally I think he's sick of companies owning his work. With his web site (and working with DV) he's found that he can be a different kind of director AND own his own work.


I hear that, Jason, but my perplexity has to do with his choice of a camera that can't give him 24 progressive frames, not with the low resolution of SD digital video, which I love (Super 8 and 16mm reversal blown up to 35 can be gorgeously grainy, for instance). I am not surprised by his rationale at all, but I think he does lose something by adding those six frames per second.
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#6 Matt Pacini

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 06:15 PM

This has come up before.

It's been many, many years since David Lynch has made a film that has come close to breaking even.
Frankly, I think nobody is throwing money at him anymore, so he is reduced to shooting cheap.
Even his most critically acclaimed films (like Mulholland Drive) have sucked farts at the box office.
If you don't believe me, go to the link below and type in all the Lynch films you can think of:

http://www.boxofficemojo.com/daily/

MP
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 07:02 PM

But even if that were true (and I doubt that he can't afford to shoot film), that doesn't explain a preference for the PD150 when there are better video cameras out there. To me, it just shows that the issue ISN'T budget, because if budget were the only thing driving his choice of format, he'd try and use the best video camera he could get his hands on. Clearly it's an aesthetic choice.
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#8 Chris Burke

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 07:05 PM

This has come up before.

It's been many, many years since David Lynch has made a film that has come close to breaking even.
Frankly, I think nobody is throwing money at him anymore, so he is reduced to shooting cheap.
Even his most critically acclaimed films (like Mulholland Drive) have sucked farts at the box office.
If you don't believe me, go to the link below and type in all the Lynch films you can think of:

http://www.boxofficemojo.com/daily/

MP



He is not all that poor though. Most of us on these boards are of modest means, David Lynch's pockets are far deeper than many of us, so my point is, he could have afforded 35mm if he wanted it. He is used to a lot of experimentation, so DV is a logical choice. He has always clashed with hollywood, so to be more self sufficient, as he thinks he is, he is making a rather safe choice. I have a feeling he will shoot film again, just not for a while. It would be cool if he went with Super 8
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#9 Steven C. Boone

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 02:55 PM

He is not all that poor though. Most of us on these boards are of modest means, David Lynch's pockets are far deeper than many of us, so my point is, he could have afforded 35mm if he wanted it. He is used to a lot of experimentation, so DV is a logical choice. He has always clashed with hollywood, so to be more self sufficient, as he thinks he is, he is making a rather safe choice. I have a feeling he will shoot film again, just not for a while. It would be cool if he went with Super 8

Not to beat a comatose horse, but I would love to see some of these freewheeling auteurs embrace the DVX-100A, which produces some gorgeous images, even in the hands of nobodies like me. Love to see Wong Kar-Wai and Chris Doyle do some run-and-gun stuff with it, for instance...

But in the end it's an aesthetic choice, as David says. Lynch just likes the industrial video/porn look, I supppose. Judging from his previous films, coulda fooled me.
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#10 Lars.Erik

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 07:25 PM

Hey there. I was a DP on a tv-series this summer. On that series was a operator who worked on the above mentioned Lynch film.

And yes, I also asked: "what is he thinking? shooting on DP-150?"

David said that he had chosen video because:

a) he didn't want the look of the film to overshadow the actors. He wanted to tell a story about people. And letting a camera just be a camera.

B) now, he chose the PD because he liked it. Period. What can one say? He's David Lynch. One of the last TRUE masters. He shot a lot of footage himself, and there was also 2 other operators on it. My operator and one more. Don't know who. So there was a lot of 3 camera setting there.

Saw some stills of the set. The set looks like a Lynch set. I'm looking forward to it. Just because it's Lynch. Hey, if he shot in S-VHS I'd still see it. Becuase it's a Lynch film.

Edited by Lars.Erik, 30 November 2005 - 07:27 PM.

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#11 Lars.Erik

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 07:46 PM

And I have to add, this I'm sorry.

As far as "break even" goes, who the f.... cares? Thank god for Europe. Most of his films are distributed and financed through Europe now. The US has become, sadly, a kind of McDonald's when it comes to movies. Spitting out "blockbuster" after "blockbuster", sure the add looks a bit exciting. Then, when you take a bite at it, man, I get depressed over how much money is spent on making the same crap over and over again. We need people like Lynch. We still need to seee true film once in a while.

Of course, there are good films in the US. And some of the best workers in the world. It's just the system over there now. Hope you can get real film people in executive positions again.
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#12 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 08:22 PM

a little off subject, but anyone who thinks of dv as simply a cheap low-res stand in for film should watch godard's "in praise of love" from a few years ago-- by far the best application of dv i've seen yet. he's an old man now, but he's still showing how to approach things in a new way.
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#13 joshua gallegos

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 03:56 PM

I just saw the short and thought it was incredible. I don't like how almost all cinematographers are conditioned to create impeccable images that look pristine with no visible grain, etc. in a way cinematographers can be pretty snobbish when it comes to creating images. I like cinematographers like Gregg Toland who were more about composition and movement, image size. If you listen to David Lynch speak in certain interviews, he's not zoned in on narrow-minded thinking, but he uses anything within his disposal to be creative, whether it be using a DV camera to continue making his great work. 

 


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#14 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 12:42 AM

David Lynch a bit weird to me... But as for his choice of Camera - probably because he likes the look of interlaced SD. Someone with his money could certainly afford a few grand to get a pretty nice 4k progressive camera. Since he does not, I assume he shoots on it because he likes the way it handles and looks.

 

That is just my assumption though. 


Edited by Landon D. Parks, 30 April 2016 - 12:42 AM.

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#15 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 01:03 AM

This thread was started in 2005, so shooting with a PD 150 would've been in fashion then. The only 4k camera around at roughly that time would be the DALSA.


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#16 joshua gallegos

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 07:42 AM

He also used it to film Inland Empire and also served as his own cinematographer. that just shows me this whole "prestige" in moviemaking doesn't come from pretty images, a lot of cinematographers are obsessed with getting the cleanest image possible. I've never really liked that, it shouldn't have to be that way all the time. David is just a great reminder that cinema is anything that you want it to be.

Edited by joshua gallegos, 30 April 2016 - 07:43 AM.

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#17 Manu Delpech

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 05:06 PM

You guys do know he's going back to film with Twin Peaks?


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#18 joshua gallegos

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 05:34 PM

It says he's filming digital on imdb. http://www.imdb.com/...ref_=tt_dt_spec


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#19 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 12:12 AM

You guys do know he's going back to film with Twin Peaks?

 

As Joshua said, Twin Peaks will be digitally shot.

Source: http://welcometotwin...-peaks-digital/


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#20 Manu Delpech

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 11:34 AM

Booooooooooooooo, he changed his tune. 


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