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Kicker light


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#1 SSJR

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 01:29 AM

What is the actual definition of a kicker?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 02:37 AM

I'm not sure if there is an "official" definition, but basically it is a hot edge or rim light on one side of a face.
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#3 SSJR

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 09:57 AM

I'm not sure if there is an "official" definition, but basically it is a hot edge or rim light on one side of a face.



If a kicker is a rim light what do you call a low down diffused smaller light, strait on that serves as an eye-light and fills in the details and hard shadows, I thought that was a kicker... or is that just a fill light that also serves as an eye-light?

Edited by SSJR, 22 November 2005 - 09:58 AM.

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#4 Chris Fernando

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 11:03 AM

serves as an eye-light and fills in the details and hard shadows


Something that "fills" in the details and hard shadows is a ______________ (drum roll)
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 11:45 AM

If a kicker is a rim light what do you call a low down diffused smaller light, strait on that serves as an eye-light and fills in the details and hard shadows, I thought that was a kicker... or is that just a fill light that also serves as an eye-light?


Yes, that's a fill light that is also acting as an eyelight. Generally a fill light will create some sort of glint in the eyes. Eyelights alone are supposed to be so dim as to not really add much fill, just create the glint, but the truth is that most eyelights also act as a fill light. But some fill lights may be so large & diffused as to not create a strong glint in the eye, so aren't great eyelights.
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#6 Oli Soravia

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 03:00 PM

Here in europe a kicker is a source direction which comes from below 3/4 backwards.
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#7 dbledwn11

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 03:01 PM

on that note has anyone got any quick and easy ways of creating a good eyelight.

Edited by dbledwn11, 22 November 2005 - 03:02 PM.

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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 03:11 PM

Almost any frontal fill light will create a glint in the eye. As for specifically just getting a glint, any light right next to the lens (usually on top) will do the trick. I've underslung Tweenies or smaller lights using a stand with a baby offset, and I've had Dedolights mounted to the rods of the camera (using a baby spud bracket from Panavision built for their Panalight (Obie). For some dumb reason, Panavision obsoleted their tungsten obie light and replaced it with an HMI version that hums.
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#9 Gilbert

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 10:43 PM

What is the actual definition of a kicker?


Definitions:

Kicker
Generally a hard light source used to provide obvious highlights. (alt) A type of back light that is used to apply a Rim light to an actor's face.

KICKER LIGHT
Lanterns placed to the side of the actor to maximize the sculptural quality of the light are sometimes known as KICKERS.

Hope this helps,
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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 10:48 PM

"Kicker" is a nickname and should suggest something that "kicks", pops out, hence why it is a hot raking light (the light is glancing or "kicking" off of a surface), usually a hot edge on something.

Of course, nowadays we tend to call any edge light on a face a kicker, even if it is soft and dim...
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#11 Joseph White

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 12:19 AM

i've always found that a small china ball with a 75 watt bulb on a dimmer right over lens is a great eyelight. and its very easy to move around and control. the kino flo kamio ringlite can give you an interesting eyelight, but it pretty much always looks like a kamio ringlite (you can often see the actual ring of light in a person's eyes) which can be a neat effect but not for everyone.
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#12 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 12:23 AM

I was just thinking today that the old low-tech method of using a hardware store small aluminum reflector dish with a light bulb and a clamp would work pretty well -- it's light enough to clamp onto the mag of a Panaflex without too much effort.
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