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Shooting student film-Outdoors/night/Brooklyn Bridge


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#1 bearcub

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 02:55 AM

I'm going to be shooting a MOS assignment on the Brooklyn Bridge in a few nights. I was wondering if anyone could recommend a decent color film stock. I want to have a cold blue like color to picture...something like Mike Leigh's Naked.

I'm thinking of using a Beaulieu or Canon Scoopic.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 11:57 AM

I'm going to be shooting a MOS assignment on the Brooklyn Bridge in a few nights. I was wondering if anyone could recommend a decent color film stock. I want to have a cold blue like color to picture...something like Mike Leigh's Naked.

I'm thinking of using a Beaulieu or Canon Scoopic.


Sort of depends on what the Brooklyn Bridge is lit by at night -- I seem to recall tungsten plus sodium vapor (which render as orange on film). Now if it were lit by mercury vapor lamps, these would render as blue-green at night on film, but I don't think it is.

Of course, you can play around with the color in post to make it bluer.

You'll need to use 500 ASA stock, either Kodak 7218, Kodak Expression 7229 or Fuji Eterna F-500T. I don't know how fast your lens is though, or whether your camera can undercrank if ncessary to get enough exposure. Generally you need to use a fast lens (T/2.0 or wider) and you may need to run the camera at a lower frame rate to gain more exposure (although this will make cars moving on the bridge look faster.) Using some old zoom lens on the camera at 24 fps may not get you enough exposure except under the brightest-lit areas. Unless you push-process the film but then you may get too much graininess.
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#3 bearcub

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 11:28 AM

Mr. Mullen,

Thanks for you advice, I love your work with Michael Polish by the way...

I had my actor all ready to go the other night on the bridge but I didn't get a good reading on my light meter. At the very least it asked for a 1 when the best my zoom lens could get was a 2.2 but I shot stuff anyway (I went with regular 16mm 7218)...I'm debating at the moment whether I should have that film processed at all... I imagine I got some sort of image...should I have it push processed? Honestly I don't remember even getting a reading...I don't feel like paying $50 for 200ft of black leader. Or save it for another day (some sort of artsy superimposition assignment...)

David Ortega
Philadelphia
UARTS
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 01:08 PM

Well, meters don't really lie, so if it said you needed to shoot at f/1.0 and you shot at f/2.2, then you're maybe two stops underexposed. However, that doesn't mean that there is no image on the film, which can record detail four or so stops under, it's just underexposed and dim overall. It may OK for a night scene, just somewhat grainy & murky.

I'd probably get it pushed one-stop and then look at it, maybe correct it in post further. At least you'll learn something.
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#5 bearcub

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 11:59 AM

Mr. Mullen,

Thanks again for all your help, the project turned out well and my instructors were quite pleased. I can't wait to shoot again next semester...in the mean time I was thinking of picking up a K-3 camera (as they're affordable enough for me) to play with...any experience with the K-3s?
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 12:03 PM

So what did you end up doing? Shooting wide-open and pushing one-stop? How did it look?

I don't have any experience with K3's.
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#7 Trevor Greenfield

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 01:46 PM

There are quite a few K3 threads in the 16mm section that talk about the pros/cons of the camera in detail and show you how to remove loop formers etc.
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#8 bearcub

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 12:48 PM

I Shot wide-open and pushed one-stop. That 7218 stock is amazing. I wished my tracking shots were a little more steady...but that camera is so heavy. I got a lot out of that project. I can't wait to shoot again... When I get back to school in a few weeks I'll include some of the stills in this thread.

I'm becoming more interested in a career in filmmaking. I don't think I have the talent to be the director of photography, but loading film, and setting up the camera is endlessly fun. Any suggestions on a direction I could take? I make my way to New York often to pick up film, equipment and movies (I just saw 2046 a few ago...amazing) but I would like to find work on sets...

Happy New Year!



There are quite a few K3 threads in the 16mm section that talk about the pros/cons of the camera in detail and show you how to remove loop formers etc.


Thanks, I found a few informative threads!
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#9 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 09:54 PM

. I don't think I have the talent to be the director of photography, but loading film, and setting up the camera is endlessly fun. Any suggestions on a direction I could take?

You described the position of (3rd 2nd) assistant camera operator quite well. load the mags, swap the film , check the gate, pull focus, pull appature, Run the clapper. The exact distibution of duties does depend on what union you are dealing with and how big the crew is..

The other simalar types of Positions that come to mind are the folks who do "old fashioned" motion control special effects (or has that all be replaced by CGI these days)

Optical printer work is also probaly simalar, in that you would be playing with a camera connected to a projector and adjusting the setup perhaps each frame.
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#10 Stephen Williams

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Posted 30 December 2005 - 10:43 AM

The other simalar types of Positions that come to mind are the folks who do "old fashioned" motion control special effects (or has that all be replaced by CGI these days)

Optical printer work is also probaly simalar, in that you would be playing with a camera connected to a projector and adjusting the setup perhaps each frame.



Hi,

Motion Control work is still done, working with CGI quite often.

I don't think there are many people slaving over optical printers today, I have not touched one for 15 years!

Cheers

Stephen Williams MoCo & DoP
www.stephenw.com
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