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Which camera


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#1 LondonFilmMan

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 05:13 AM

In 1996 I began by using a JVC GRDV1 (a 1 CCD DV camera) as an amateur and over the next 6 years I progressed, but only to a (3 ccd) Sony TRV900, an NTSC camera. Actually, I am going to switch over to 35 mm film because I wanted to get that film look and get a completely stable image. But, it would still be nice to have a DV camera. My question is which one?

Quality is really the only thing that counts to me. Nice colours, stable image... I don't need all the buttons and switches. I never use them anyway to be honest. I ask because I have seen so many types: DVC, DVCPRO, DVCPRO50, DVC PRO HD, HDV...Jesus...which one? I don't want to go over $6000, but I NEED to be able to sell the footage to TV and even, show it on a large cinema screen, and for that image with its colours to be very nice. I wonder, am I hoping for too much?
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#2 Keith Mottram

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 09:52 AM

In 1996 I began by using a JVC GRDV1 (a 1 CCD DV camera) as an amateur and over the next 6 years I progressed, but only to a (3 ccd) Sony TRV900, an NTSC camera. Actually, I am going to switch over to 35 mm film because I wanted to get that film look and get a completely stable image. But, it would still be nice to have a DV camera. My question is which one?

Quality is really the only thing that counts to me. Nice colours, stable image... I don't need all the buttons and switches. I never use them anyway to be honest. I ask because I have seen so many types: DVC, DVCPRO, DVCPRO50, DVC PRO HD, HDV...Jesus...which one? I don't want to go over $6000, but I NEED to be able to sell the footage to TV and even, show it on a large cinema screen, and for that image with its colours to be very nice. I wonder, am I hoping for too much?


yes you are hoping for too much, but more importantly did you change your name by depol or were you born LondonFilmMan? And is your name London FilmMan or London Film-Man (maybe your pa was Film and your ma was Man) what are the chances?

Keith
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#3 Nate Downes

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 07:57 AM

In 1996 I began by using a JVC GRDV1 (a 1 CCD DV camera) as an amateur and over the next 6 years I progressed, but only to a (3 ccd) Sony TRV900, an NTSC camera. Actually, I am going to switch over to 35 mm film because I wanted to get that film look and get a completely stable image. But, it would still be nice to have a DV camera. My question is which one?

Quality is really the only thing that counts to me. Nice colours, stable image... I don't need all the buttons and switches. I never use them anyway to be honest. I ask because I have seen so many types: DVC, DVCPRO, DVCPRO50, DVC PRO HD, HDV...Jesus...which one? I don't want to go over $6000, but I NEED to be able to sell the footage to TV and even, show it on a large cinema screen, and for that image with its colours to be very nice. I wonder, am I hoping for too much?


DVX-100 or you could even do HD with the Sony Z1.
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#4 Peter J DeCrescenzo

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 11:22 AM

... it would still be nice to have a DV camera. My question is which one? Quality is really the only thing that counts to me. Nice colours, stable image... I don't need all the buttons and switches. I never use them anyway to be honest. ... I wonder, am I hoping for too much?


Yes, probably.

If you don't learn what the most basic "buttons and switches" do on a modern camcorder you won't get "Quality ... Nice colours, stable image" most of the time.

A modern cam's default settings and default auto mode will all but guarantee results far less than the cam's desirable capabilities.

If you don't learn at least basic camcorder operation you'll get a "home movie" look a good part of the time, even with a $100K cam.

It's OK if you don't learn how to operate a video cam -- not everyone should be a video jockey.

At least film's much wider lattitude (compared to video) perhaps allows a bit more freedom to "just do it". But film's per-foot cost sometimes gives pause to producer/director/shooters who just wing it. But sometimes not.

In either case, film or video, it really depends on how much time and money you're willing to burn until you stumble upon some good results.

If you have specific camera-operation questions, there are many folks here willing & able to help.

(And yes, using your real name will foster a more collegial, professional dialog.)

All the best,

- Peter DeCrescenzo
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#5 2000lux

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 12:35 PM

With a budget of $6000 I'd probably get a DVX-100B and a GOOD tripod, like a Sachtler. I might also look in to a Glidecam or Steady Cam Junior if I was making movies. Those items ought to help you out with the stability issue unless you're actually having trouble transfering to film or some thing.
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