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Super16 Blow up to 35mm


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#1 Alex Fuchs

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 04:20 PM

Hello,
I'm going to shot an film on S16mm and the production want to make a blow up to 35mm. My question is now, on which film stock should I shoot to get the best results for the blow up. There are outdoor night scenes I want to shoot with the KODAK Vision2 5218 material and there are indoor shoots I want to shoot with the Vision2 5217 material. I talked to the production manager who talked allready to KODAK and I wondered about that they recommend him to shoot the indoor scenes with the 500T material to, because this would cause the best results. In my opion this made no sense, so I need your help. Would it not to grainy if I shoot on the 5218? It's my first S16mm production with an 35mm blow up, so I'm not sure what to do. Thanks for your help.
Alex
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#2 Robert Glenn

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 04:37 PM

Hello,
I'm going to shot an film on S16mm and the production want to make a blow up to 35mm. My question is now, on which film stock should I shoot to get the best results for the blow up. There are outdoor night scenes I want to shoot with the KODAK Vision2 5218 material and there are indoor shoots I want to shoot with the Vision2 5217 material. I talked to the production manager who talked allready to KODAK and I wondered about that they recommend him to shoot the indoor scenes with the 500T material to, because this would cause the best results. In my opion this made no sense, so I need your help. Would it not to grainy if I shoot on the 5218? It's my first S16mm production with an 35mm blow up, so I'm not sure what to do. Thanks for your help.
Alex

Vera Drake was shot on 7218 and processed through digital intermediate, then expanded to 35mm. Might not be the best way to judge a photochemical blow up but it looks immaculate
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 09:15 PM

I'm surprised a Kodak rep would tell you that you'd get BETTER results with 7218 instead of 7217. I mean, they are an extremely close match, so that's not an issue.
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#4 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 01:52 AM

Maybe the message was: better to use the 500T stock at proper of slightly overexposure than the 200Tstock with underexposure.
Pushing will not help if there is no exposure to begin with. Exterior nights can be very beautiful if properly exposed on 500T.
An underexposed night shot cannot be 'slightly downprinted' and will give greyish blacks while a denser negative will give nice blacks, even on a night shot.
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#5 Sam Wells

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 10:49 AM

Maybe the message was: better to use the 500T stock at proper of slightly overexposure than the 200Tstock with underexposure.


One of the best looking blowups I saw last year was shot on 7248 rated 64.

FWIW

-Sam
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 07:55 PM

For lowest grain, use the lowest speed stock you have the light for. But better to use a faster stock than to underexpose if you don't have the light for the stop you want. Bottom line, avoid underexposure. If you are using ND filtration, move to a lower speed stock.
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Ritter Battery

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