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tv changing light effect


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#1 Moshe Mishali

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 09:43 AM

hello
wer'e shooting a video clip with a dsr 570 and in one of the scenes we have a T.V. that is on and suppose to light one of the characters in changing lights obviously the real t.v. light isn't enough so i would like to make it stronger and more accurate to light my character.
my lighting set is:

1 4 ft kino flo (tan light)
2 1K fersnel
2 650W fersnel
2 300W fersnel
3 pin spots
1 mini broot
2 par 64
2 large foamcore panels

i was thinking of using the kino to create the effect but i'm not sure about it.
if u have any ideals i would like to hear them.

thanks
mosh
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#2 Alex Haspel

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 09:54 AM

hello
wer'e shooting a video clip with a dsr 570 and in one of the scenes we have a T.V. that is on and suppose to light one of the characters in changing lights obviously the real t.v. light isn't enough so i would like to make it stronger and more accurate to light my character.
my lighting set is:

1 4 ft kino flo (tan light)
2 1K fersnel
2 650W fersnel
2 300W fersnel
3 pin spots
1 mini broot
2 par 64
2 large foamcore panels

i was thinking of using the kino to create the effect but i'm not sure about it.
if u have any ideals i would like to hear them.

thanks
mosh


my first idea would be a video beamer with a wide angle lens trough some lee diffusion.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 11:36 AM

A video projector playing some footage through some light diffusion might be the most accurate effect, but it might not be bright enough.

The simplest thing I've done is to gel a 4' 4-bank Kino (or put two 55 tubes and two 32 tubes in) to be Half Blue, and then just wave my fingers and hands in front of the fixture in some sort of random pattern. This works surprisingly well because the light flickers and shifts around naturally as if it were an image moving on the TV set. You want to occasionally really block a lot of the light quickly with both your hands to simulate more of a hard cut on the image playing.

Of course, it doesn't have to be a Kino, it could be a light shining through a diffusion frame.

The hardest part is getting the actors to not laugh as they watch you do this. If you're waving your hands and fingers between a light and a diffusion frame, they aren't as distracted at least by the spectacle.

So what I usually do (not having the space or available hands) is put two tweenies with 1/2 Blue on a two-spud baby adaptor, so I can fit then side-by-side on one stand (usually a primi stand, really short). I shine the two lights thru a frame (usually 2x3) of Opal or 216, something light so that there is a slight double-shadow, and then I put the lights on a flicker box, each on a different rate. Sometimes I add a third light behind the diffusion frame that doesn't flicker at all, or is on a hand-dimmer and is just raised and lowered now & then.

It's always better to be too subtle with the effect than too obvious.

Edited by David Mullen, 26 November 2005 - 11:37 AM.

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#4 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 11:36 AM

I think the kinos are a good idea, may be a bit weak. The video beamer can be a brilliant idea. Diffusion on a punctual source ora broad souce (why not the mini brutes) because a tv set is a wide source. If you use Kinos or any other source, the trick is light level changes as well as color changes. You can use bits of gel on wood sticks, play with a flag or the kinos bardoors. Problem sometimes is the sound it makes...
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#5 Alex Haspel

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 04:40 PM

The video beamer can be a brilliant idea.


thank you!
:D
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#6 Frank Barrera

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 11:03 PM

something to keep in mind is that the "tv gag" can look a lot of different ways. it can be realistic. it can be over the top funny. it can be strange. it usually is never just a tv gag. it should add to the story in someway. even if it means that it's realistic and you want it to look "normal". you mentioned that you are doing a "video clip". i take it you are are doing a music video. so depending upon the style of music and the style of the visuals you will find what works best to enhance your story.

having said all that, the above advice (a couple of small units through CTB and diffusion on hand dimmers or a flicker box) works well. this gives you great control in terms of the effect. for example if you want the tv to be brighter during a particular part of the song or if you want it to be in rhythm with the beat etc. you can be very elaborate or very simple. i once built a spinning wheel out of foam core and cut a bunch of wholes in it and filled each whole with different gels. mostly 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 CTB and a little 1/4 plus green as well. we put four 300 Watt fresnels through it and had it on a flicker box. the foam core spun on the thread of a dismantled c-stand arm. naturally the intended effect we we're going for was a bit odd. the character was watching t.v. and having a nervous break down. we also had all the practicals on dimmers as well and during the shot every light was flickering at certain key moments... but you get the idea...

i've never seen a beam projector used. it seems like it would restrict your control over the intended effect. but i'm just guessing...


good luck

Frank B
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