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85b versus 85


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#1 Robert Glenn

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 11:57 AM

I know that 85b knocks daylight down to 3200, but 85 is generally listed as the filter to use.. How much difference is there between the 2 based on experiences?
Also from a google search, I got the impression that an 85b has a UV protection element to it.. any confirmation of that?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 01:02 PM

The 85B corrects 5500K to 3200K.

The 85 corrects 5500K to 3400K. For most manufacturers like Tiffen or Harrison & Harrison, the 85 and 85A are the same filter. It was developed for "Type A" films balanced for 3400K photoflood illumination (like K40.) Hence the "A" in 85A. Type B films are balanced for 3200K, hence the "B" in 85B.

We've had an argument here before become a few filter companies (Hoya?) claim that an 85 and 85A are slightly different and they are the only ones that offer both. Most filter companies just make something labelled either an 85 or 85A for correcting 5500K to 3400K.

Anyway, it's not unusual for 85B filters to be referred to casually as "85", like when renting an "85ND" combo, or on a film set when calling out for a filter. And the truth is that if you are shooting color negative, then it doesn't make much difference because you can easily time for the degree of warmth you want. But technically, you should use an 85B filter for correcting daylight to tungsten for color negative film.

Edited by David Mullen, 27 November 2005 - 01:02 PM.

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#3 steve hyde

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 02:53 PM

The 85B corrects 5500K to 3200K.

The 85 corrects 5500K to 3400K. For most manufacturers like Tiffen or Harrison & Harrison, the 85 and 85A are the same filter. It was developed for "Type A" films balanced for 3400K photoflood illumination (like K40.) Hence the "A" in 85A. Type B films are balanced for 3200K, hence the "B" in 85B.

We've had an argument here before become a few filter companies (Hoya?) claim that an 85 and 85A are slightly different and they are the only ones that offer both. Most filter companies just make something labelled either an 85 or 85A for correcting 5500K to 3400K.

Anyway, it's not unusual for 85B filters to be referred to casually as "85", like when renting an "85ND" combo, or on a film set when calling out for a filter. And the truth is that if you are shooting color negative, then it doesn't make much difference because you can easily time for the degree of warmth you want. But technically, you should use an 85B filter for correcting daylight to tungsten for color negative film.



Thanks for this explanation David.....very helpful...

Steve
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

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Rig Wheels Passport

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The Slider

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