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Super 8 film storage


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#1 Chris Alex

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 07:10 AM

Hi,
Ive shot 10 cartridges of super 8 Kodak Ektachrome VNF-1 process (The old stock, not the new 64t).
Ive shot my footage in July and I've kept it in my fridge till now.
Im gonne be sending it to a lab for processing and telecine.
Will everything turn out to be ok at proccessing?



Thank you..
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 11:43 AM

Hi,
Ive shot 10 cartridges of super 8 Kodak Ektachrome VNF-1 process (The old stock, not the new 64t).
Ive shot my footage in July and I've kept it in my fridge till now.
Im gonne be sending it to a lab for processing and telecine.
Will everything turn out to be ok at proccessing?
Thank you..


There may be a slight color shift, and some buildup of grain due to film age. Remember, the films for process VNF were discontinued almost two years ago, so the films were likely about two years old when you shot them, and now you have six months of latent image keeping. Why did you wait so long to get them processed?
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#3 steve hyde

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 01:45 PM

Once your break the foil on your film you should not put it back in the fridge (at least I don't). Temperature fluctuations are hard on film. Especially exposed film that has not been processed.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 02:13 PM

Once your break the foil on your film you should not put it back in the fridge (at least I don't). Temperature fluctuations are hard on film. Especially exposed film that has not been processed.


The risk of putting film that has been removed from the sealed factory packaging back into a refrigerator or freezer is that the film may have been exposed to high levels of humidity, which then can actually condense into free water at low temperatures, causing ferrotyping or other moisture-related problems. Severe temperature fluctuations can loosen a roll, or cause ice crystals to form. Ideally, store film in the original factory-sealed packaging, and process it as soon as possible after exposure.
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#5 Erdwolf_TVL

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 02:13 PM

Hi,
Ive shot 10 cartridges of super 8 Kodak Ektachrome VNF-1 process (The old stock, not the new 64t).
Ive shot my footage in July and I've kept it in my fridge till now.
Im gonne be sending it to a lab for processing and telecine.
Will everything turn out to be ok at proccessing?
Thank you..


VNF-1 Ektachrome can still be processed using E-6 Chemistry. The results can be average or good, depending on the amount of care taken by the lab. I did a similar experiment by having VNF-1 processed as if it were E-6. Some parts were satisfactory. In some other parts the blacks have a green undertone.
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#6 John Hyde

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 11:25 PM

VNF-1 Ektachrome can still be processed using E-6 Chemistry. The results can be average or good, depending on the amount of care taken by the lab. I did a similar experiment by having VNF-1 processed as if it were E-6. Some parts were satisfactory. In some other parts the blacks have a green undertone.


Interesting. If the green undertone is minor I'll bet it could easily be removed in telecine.
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