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Film credits


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#1 bigal

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 12:50 PM

Someone told me that when you make a film, or even just a small project, that you must give credit to the comany whose equipment you used. For example, if you used a sony camera or operating system, you must give credit to sony and the actual equipment you used from them. Is this true or is some of it true? I've never heard of this before nor do I remember seeing it in actual movies, so I'm curious to know what the ruling is. Thanks.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 01:32 PM

You give vendor or manufacturer credit either out of politeness, out of thanks, out of the need to be informative, or out of contractual obligation. Some rental agreements ask for an end credit for the rental house. Just because you shot on a Sony F900 doesn't necessarily mean you have to give Sony a credit.
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#3 bigal

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 01:45 PM

So if you edit the film or project using Avid Synphony or something, you would only HAVE to give them a credit if you had a contract with them or does buying the product count as a contract? I'm just trying to be sure on all basis so that I don't make a critical mistake when editing my stuff. thanks for the help.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 02:06 PM

Unless you signed some sort of agreement with AVID guaranteeing them a credit, you don't have to credit them. But if you're not sure if you signed an agreement with them, give them a credit just in case.

Usually when a company actually gets credit contractually, they supply corporate logo artwork to appear in the end credits, like for Fuji, Kodak, Panavision, Arri, etc.

I've shot plenty of movies edited on AVID's and not seen a credit for them in the end titles, but occasionally I do see one in other people's movies.
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 03:51 PM

Hi,

Panavision is known to give big discounts on rental equipment to films, in return they insist on a screen credit.

Stephen
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 03:55 PM

Presumably it would have to be a fairly upscale film for it to be worth it for them, though.

Phil
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#7 bigal

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 04:58 PM

well I bought the system I didn't have to sign a thing, I was just given a registration number for when I put it on my pc. so from what your telling me, I don't have to credit them at all unless I just want to. thanks for the input, saved me alot of worying.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 05:06 PM

Presumably it would have to be a fairly upscale film for it to be worth it for them, though.


If you're talking about Panavision, they actually are LESS inclined to give deals to bigger productions -- after all, those films don't need a deal as badly. I've done four Panavision anamorphic features and the cost of the same package, more or less, has been higher as the budgets get higher, closer to book rate.
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#9 Dominic Case

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 09:02 PM

You give vendor or manufacturer credit either out of politeness, out of thanks, out of the need to be informative, or out of contractual obligation.

Says it all, really.
Politeness - well, not sure if this is different from the next one.
Thanks - if they've done you a favour, or been especially helpful.
Informative - if you want to make a point, as in "edited on film by . . ." or otherwise
Contractual - this is the commonest. Maybe the company has given you a special price in exchange for an agreed credit.

The only confusion arises when the audience can't tell the difference between an informative credit and a contractual or thanks one. Then you start to see the quibbles about where the credit must go, how big, and so on. For example if the company I work for provided normal services to a film, we often get a credit. If we provided exceptional services for a knock-down price in contractual exchange for a credit, I want to be sure that it's a bigger credit than the free one!

But I'd say to Bigal (who asked the question) . . .if a company or supplier or vendor hasn't asked you for a credit, by way of a specific contract, then there;s no need to put one in. There are usually enough credits already :blink:
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