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Angenieux 9.5-95mm for CP-16R + tap


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#1 3ldfilms

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 09:35 PM

Hi all,

This is my first post and I was wondering if anyone has any opinions on the Angenieux 9.5-95mm lense for the CP-16R. I just bought the camera on ebay (and it is in transit) and am not familiar with that lense...was wondering if people had any thoughts on it.

Also, any recommendations of where I can get a video tap for it? It does have the port on top and was wondering what the options are (especilly in terms of price).

Thanks in advance,

Ed
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#2 Michael Carter

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 10:09 PM

I have one of those for my Auricon. It is really huge and heavy. The dog leg viewer is off and filled with epoxy. That opened up the light path. The lens does focus and zoom well on a h16 Bolex only if I make sure it is tightly held up and not pulling off the turret even a little. Screw in filters are needed about 85mm, not sure of that, and a lens shade. I don't think you will be hand holding it much.
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#3 Robert Hughes

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 10:36 PM

Visual Products will install a video tap in your CP-16R for $1K:

http://www.visualpro...ctID=446&Cat=11

I think the 9.5 - 95mm lens is a variant on the standard Angenieux 12-120 lens. The VP people could tell you more. Also check with Whitehouse.
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#4 Oliver Gläser

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 03:11 AM

I have a 9.5 - 95mm lens, the second such that I have owned... It is been immaculately maintained and the glass is great. Both lenses have always been very very sharp and versitile. They focus closely, are very sharp, resolve colors nicely, are reasonably fast and are fairly contrasty... however, it all depends on how they have been maintained. Make sure to collimate the lens, but if the glass is clean and clear and you take care of it, you may find that you like its properties.

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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 04:42 AM

Hi all,

This is my first post and I was wondering if anyone has any opinions on the Angenieux 9.5-95mm lense for the CP-16R. I just bought the camera on ebay (and it is in transit) and am not familiar with that lense...was wondering if people had any thoughts on it.

Also, any recommendations of where I can get a video tap for it? It does have the port on top and was wondering what the options are (especilly in terms of price).

Thanks in advance,

Ed


I had a 9.5mm to 95mm as my first zoom lens and RTE (Irish TV) used them on their CP16Rs. They do focus down to 2ft 6 inches which is useful. However, these lenses are big and don't have much contrast compared to modern lenses. I changed to a 10 to 100 T3 Zeiss after a year: it made the 9.5mm to 95mm look like it had a low contrast or double fog filter in front of it. However, I shot a film in B&W using the Angenieux, it looked much sharper than when shooting colour.

Last I heard Whitehouse AV still handles CP16s, you may have to fit a more modern video tap camera. These cameras were used mostly for news, so I suspect there aren't too many fitted with video assist.
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#6 Robert Hughes

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 07:36 PM

Why wouldn't they have video assist? I mean, it was for TV news right? :huh:
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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 06:42 AM

Why wouldn't they have video assist? I mean, it was for TV news right? :huh:


The CP 16 was in mostly in use for news during the 1970s and early 1980s. Video assist was only used then on dramas and commercials, Cinema Products were promoting a production version of the camera, but it never really caught on.

It was rare at that time for a 16mm camera used on documentaries, never mind news, to have a video assist fitted. Basically it's an extra cost (never mind equipment and it also slows you down) and many, if not most feature films didn't use video assist at that time.

News crews didn't have anyone that needed to see a video assist output and even today news crews don't often carry monitors while shooting. Documentaries being shot on video are different. On the rare modern film documentary the director will just look down the camera viewfinder before a take, usually they don't bother once they trust the camera person.
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#8 gregorscheer

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 10:02 AM

Duall cameras will fit you a video tap for under us$ 400 if my memory is right check with them http://www.duallcamera.com/


whatever was said about the usefullnes of a Video tap, you could not do without it if you wanted to use some sort of steady cam or jib shots
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#9 Mitch Gross

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 12:27 PM

AZSpectrum makes videotaps for a variety of cameras including the CP-16. Since you already have the port and thus likely the beamsplitter, the tap is pretty easy.
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#10 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 12:49 PM

Duall cameras will fit you a video tap for under us$ 400 if my memory is right check with them http://www.duallcamera.com/
whatever was said about the usefullnes of a Video tap, you could not do without it if you wanted to use some sort of steady cam or jib shots


Being a Steadicam owner/operator I'm not denying the usefulness of video taps. However, the only time I've ever used video assist on a film documentary is when a Steadicam or other kit requires it. The budgets on documentaries are usually too tight for the extra kit, you're lucky if they're shooting on film at all.

My comments were addressing the period when the CP 16 was in use on broadcast TV and if you'd have used a video tap for TV news on a CP16. The answer to that would be no, it's a higher end production tool.

However, if this camera has the optics already fitted, it should be possible to fit a modern CCD camera.

The video assist is now an accepted tool on productions complete with the video village. Of course, the monitor is also now a standard piece of kit on documentaries being shot on video. However, in fast moving situations it just gets in the way and is best used in controlled set ups.
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#11 Mitch Gross

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 01:24 PM

It is important to add that due to the nature of the beamsplitter in the CP-16, I believe that you can only use a B&W videotap camera.
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#12 3ldfilms

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 03:52 PM

So the general consensus is that the lens is big and has little contrast?
It does NOT have a dog leg finder as one post indicated though.

I'm quite new to 16mm cameras (though I do a lot of still photography). I also have a K-3 that I've used a couple of times on music videos...and love the contrast on that lense (I also love the dirt all over the gate on that camera...but then I'm using that for a specific aesthetic).

That said...what would recommendations be for a decent zoom for the Cp-16R?
Someone had mentioned the Zeiss 10-100.

I'll be shooting segements of a feature on it with a lot of handheld guerrilla style shooting...so light(ish) and fast would be important factors (as is sharpness and contrast). I've probably just described an expensive lense, but maybe there's some great old glass that you guys know about. I don't care if the lense is well coated as I like lense flares for this particular project.

Suggestions?

Ed
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#13 Michael Carter

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 05:19 PM

It does NOT have a dog leg finder as one post indicated though.

It DID, but it was removed. If it was still there it'd be much more usefull for me. The lens is bigger then the 12-120 with the dogleg finder. Ones with the finder are the type A lenses. Other lenses of the same size do not have the finder ever or can't.
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#14 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 07:27 AM

It does NOT have a dog leg finder as one post indicated though.

I'm quite new to 16mm cameras (though I do a lot of still photography). I also have a K-3 that I've used a couple of times on music videos...and love the contrast on that lense (I also love the dirt all over the gate on that camera...but then I'm using that for a specific aesthetic).

That said...what would recommendations be for a decent zoom for the Cp-16R?
Someone had mentioned the Zeiss 10-100.


Suggestions?

Ed


You can't used a dog leg viewfinder lens on a CP16R, they're usually a c mount lens and were used on the early CP16 cameras that didn't have a reflex viewfinder (Also Auricons).

There are a number of lens you can buy. The 12mm to 120mm Angenieux was extremely common (however, you only can only to focus to 5ft) and you can find good examples. At T2.5 it's also faster than the T2.8 9.5 to 95.

The Zeiss 10-100 T3, has scale marking to 5 ft but can focus down to 1 meter. It gives triangular flares as against the usual multi sided. The T3 has the T* multi coating and doesn't flare as much as the 12 to 120. I don't think the older versions of the 10mm to 100 have this coating, because they're a bit slower with their max T stop. Also the zoom control goes in the opposite direction to the Angenieux and you really need a fluid drive for move action. It's pretty compact and gives good pictures when stopped down a stop. You can get a CP mount fitted, or and adapter for the Arri B mount.

The Angenieux 10 to 150 seems to have had mixed comments about it.

The 9.5mm to 57mm is compact and close focusing, but like the 10 to 150 has aperture ramping.

However, you really need to test these lenses before buying, because these older lenses vary so much.
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#15 David Akinde

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 11:47 AM

Hi all,

This is my first post and I was wondering if anyone has any opinions on the Angenieux 9.5-95mm lense for the CP-16R. I just bought the camera on ebay (and it is in transit) and am not familiar with that lense...was wondering if people had any thoughts on it.

Also, any recommendations of where I can get a video tap for it? It does have the port on top and was wondering what the options are (especilly in terms of price).

Thanks in advance,

Ed



The 9.5-95mm is an excellent zoom lens. I use one with my NPR the results have been very good
its a very sharp lens and fast enough, skin tone reproduction was great.
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