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DVX100 footage to high contrast look


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#1 Matt Lazzarini

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 02:01 PM

Hi all,

I shot a short back in June on the DVX100, my first of two experiences with the cam. The film takes place in a small apartment, revolving around a couple in a relationship affected by drugs. It's a heated and tragic story that I thought would've worked on Super 8 if we had had the budget for stock & processing, but not only didn't we have that kind of budget, I've never been too happy with most Super 8 transfers (fyi, the DVX was a freebie for the shoot).

So I lit the film with some post correction in mind, though I wasn't sure how far I'd push it at the time. I've recently acquired the footage and I've been playing around, and I thought maybe some people here would find it interesting.

Highlights are blown out, contrast amped, blacks crushed, overall image desaturated by about 40-50%.

(In the first set the character is watching television)

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#2 David Beier

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 12:12 PM

I discovered something similar to this over the summer when shooting a film. It was a noir parody but, because of budget contraints, I had no lights (I was doing it or a summer program). For most of it, I ended up opeing windows and using sunlight (something I like to do with film or video since sunlight always looks better than artificial). Anyway, when I started playing around with it in Avid, I found that desaturating the color, crushing the blacks, and uping the contrast gave it a very interesting look. Honestly, I found that it looked better than some black and white footage I had shot on 16mm a long time ago.

I think the reason that it looks so cool is this: As great as some 24p video cameras are, they still have a lower lattitude and capture color less effectivly than film. Takeing the color out helps things a lot so that one focuses only on the lighting. By uping the contrast a bat and crushing the blacks, one ends up with the a look very similar to early noirs that largely hides any video heritage. It's something that I'd like to experiment more with as soon as I get a new camea.
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#3 David Silverstein

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 02:24 PM

In my opinion you have tweaked it a little to much. Dont go toooo much on the color correcting but mess around with it. Most of those shots I like the original better.

If you can get your hands on magic bullet play around with the SuiteLook effects they have presets that mess with your colors.
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#4 David Sweetman

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 08:56 PM

Truly, image correction is huge. I like the look. Did you do that with FCP? I've found that the one thing Final Cut has over Avid is more powerful color correction. Well, that and file handling.

Also, (and obviously I can't judge your movie without having seen it) it kind of irritates me that everyone and their brother makes a film about a couple whose relationship suffers because of drugs. I dunno, maybe I'm just saying that because that's not my cup of tea. After all, as Solomon says, there's nothing new under the sun anyway, so it's impossible to have a completely original idea. Heck, I'll be the first to admit my ideas aren't original, but I do try to stay away from the student cliches.
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#5 David Silverstein

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 10:05 PM

WARNING: THIS IS A JOKE!

Hey lifetime needs new movies so why not :D.

Ok now to be serious.

Ive always liked the drug genre movies. Its a huge problem in the world but mainly in the United States we dont no when to pick up and put down the drugs. The whole world doesnt help us either sending us all of the drugs :D. We are rich bastards.
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#6 Matt Lazzarini

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 01:39 PM

Truly, image correction is huge. I like the look. Did you do that with FCP? I've found that the one thing Final Cut has over Avid is more powerful color correction. Well, that and file handling.

Also, (and obviously I can't judge your movie without having seen it) it kind of irritates me that everyone and their brother makes a film about a couple whose relationship suffers because of drugs. I dunno, maybe I'm just saying that because that's not my cup of tea. After all, as Solomon says, there's nothing new under the sun anyway, so it's impossible to have a completely original idea. Heck, I'll be the first to admit my ideas aren't original, but I do try to stay away from the student cliches.


Yup, all done in Final Cut Pro 4.5 HD.

As for the drugs, don't blame me, I don't write 'em, I just shoot 'em! LOL :lol:
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#7 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 02:09 PM

Hi,

I quite like this sort of thing, but I'd usually start with a lot (a lot lot) of underexposure, because all that clippiness doesn't do much for me. Then noise becomes a problem.

This sort of thing looks a lot better when done to uncompressed stuff.

Phil
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