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Super 8 film - Tri X - available light?


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#1 sonickel

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 07:02 PM

Hello everyone

I'm planning to shoot my first short film, on Super 8 TriX. Because we can only get locations for a short period of time, and money is v limited, I'm considering shooting with available light only. There are some outdoor locations, as well as indoor (fluoro and tungsten lights).

Do you think this will be a problem?

Thanks
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#2 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 06 December 2005 - 01:58 PM

Do you think this will be a problem?

yes, i do. :-) don't let that stop you though. i suggest you bring a powerful light on a stand, maybe a blonde or a 1k worklight, which you can use to bring up a very dark background, bounce off the ceiling for ambient fill and/or a soft top key, use as backlight for separation, or shoot right at the subject if you just can't get an exposure otherwise. it doesn't take very long to setup and will make your life easier and the film better looking.

/matt
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#3 steve hyde

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Posted 06 December 2005 - 02:21 PM

....the best "available light" stock is 7218. RE: 7266 under available light. It will look flat - as will 7218 under available light indoors.. I would take Matt's advice on lights. Shoot some tests.

When you say it is a first short, what do you mean? The first time you will shoot Super 8?

7266 on Super 8 will yeild a grainy look that will remind your audience of old movies. Guy Maddin, for example, uses these characteristics to his advantage by making his movies look like old silents. How does he do this?

He puts his actors under spotlights and exposes the film for the highlights. This makes the background go black - just like many old silents.

reference: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0346800/


hope this is somewhat helpful.

Steve
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 07 December 2005 - 08:36 AM

If you have enough light to expose the film at its rated exposure index, you will get a usable image. But good cinematography is more than just getting a "usable" image --- good cinematography starts with controlling / enhancing the lighting, or at the very least choosing a time and angle to shoot when the existing lighting gives the "look" you want.
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#5 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 07 December 2005 - 11:47 AM

good cinematography starts with controlling / enhancing the lighting

i see your point and i almost agree, but to me framing as well as camera moves always came first. maybe you mean that's more the director's job? (this is drifting off topic, so feel free to ignore what i'm about to say) i work both as a director and a dp but rarely at the same time, and i tend to leave the lighting and the operating to the dp when i'm directing, but i'm the one who selects the camera angles and moves, but i'm representing a minority these days it seems.

/matt
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 07 December 2005 - 11:21 PM

i see your point and i almost agree, but to me framing as well as camera moves always came first. maybe you mean that's more the director's job? (this is drifting off topic, so feel free to ignore what i'm about to say) i work both as a director and a dp but rarely at the same time, and i tend to leave the lighting and the operating to the dp when i'm directing, but i'm the one who selects the camera angles and moves, but i'm representing a minority these days it seems.

/matt


I said "good cinematography starts with controlling / enhancing the lighting, or at the very least choosing a time and angle to shoot when the existing lighting gives the "look" you want." Certainly things like camera angles, composition, etc. are often a collaborative decision between the cinematographer and director. Don't compartmentalize yourself. Filmmaking is usually a "team sport". :lol:
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Willys Widgets

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Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Abel Cine

The Slider

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks