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Editing 16


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#1 jijhh

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 01:05 AM

I'm completely new to shooting negative (not reversal), so I just want to know what the process is for me to edit a color 16 negative project if I'm editing on a Steinbeck flatbed. Do I ask the lab for a workprint and edit that for projection or do I edit negative and then have a print made for projection? Am I completely missing something here? I realize its a pretty basic question but I've never really had it answered.

Andrew
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 05:50 AM

I'm completely new to shooting negative (not reversal), so I just want to know what the process is for me to edit a color 16 negative project if I'm editing on a Steinbeck flatbed. Do I ask the lab for a workprint and edit that for projection or do I edit negative and then have a print made for projection? Am I completely missing something here? I realize its a pretty basic question but I've never really had it answered.

Andrew


You get the lab to make a workprint or cutting copy. You use that to edit your production on, marking any fades or dissolves on to the your edited workprint using a chinagraph pencil. You'll have to look up the symbols used, any old film editing book will have them. All the splices used cutting the workprint are tape splices, so that you can remake them and play with your timings without losing any frames.

In the meantime the neg will be stored away and you then send the neg together with the edited workprint to a neg cutter who will then match your cut workprint to the neg using the edge numbers. They usually break it into A & B rolls, so that you don't have a white flash at every splice - they use a chemical neg splicer that only overlaps one frame. With A & B rolls the splice overlap is on the black spacing between the shots, so you don't see it.

It's usual to send it to the neg cutters rather than do it yourself; you need some specialized pieces of equipment and a very clean room. You can't do it on a Steinbeck, but you might with a Pic Sync with the sound heads removed and a lot of careful handling. However, you do need the neg splicer.
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