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textured bokeh


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#1 Jason Debus

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 02:17 AM

I first noticed this technique in Exotica (1994, Paul Sarossy, now filming The Wicker Man :o ). Some shots of the DJ had backround bokeh silhouetted by the palm leaves in the club.

I really like the possibilities, and in Crash (2005, James Muro), uses this 'textured bokeh' technique quite a bit. I'm planning on doing some tests, but is it just a matter of focusing on the object doing the 'silhouetting'? (leaves, water, heat waves):

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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 05:47 PM

I'm planning on doing some tests, but is it just a matter of focusing on the object doing the 'silhouetting'? (leaves, water, heat waves):


It's usually the result of something between the lens and the plane of focus. For example you often see the pattern of filters and nets on the lens when focused on something obviously farther away. An example is your lower-right pic from Crash, where the heat from the flame is between the lens and the man's face, where the focus is set.

Needless to say you need those wonderful round highlights in the distance to reveal the pattern. Sometimes though, a highlight in the foreground can behave the same way. Watching Smallville last night, there was a shot where the camera craned past some Christmas lights in the foreground, and you could clearly see the filter pattern in the round highlights. You just have to play around to find the right distances for the lenses and f-stops you're using.
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#3 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 08:49 PM

On Bringing Out The Dead, shot by Richardson, you can for instance see the pattern of the nets used in the OOF rings.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 10:10 PM

Like here:

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#5 Tim J Durham

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 12:07 PM

I first noticed this technique in Exotica (1994, Paul Sarossy, now filming The Wicker Man :o ). Some shots of the DJ had backround bokeh silhouetted by the palm leaves in the club.

I really like the possibilities, and in Crash (2005, James Muro), uses this 'textured bokeh' technique quite a bit. I'm planning on doing some tests, but is it just a matter of focusing on the object doing the 'silhouetting'? (leaves, water, heat waves):

You can get this effect with a Nikon 500mm reflex (mirror) Nikkor stills lens:

http://www.mir.com.m...cmf5/index1.htm

I used to have one for when I shot shot the football games for my college paper. So if you can get your hands on a Camera with a Nikon mount or an adapter, that's one cheap way to do it.
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 10:37 PM

http://www.vanwalree...tics/bokeh.html

Edited by Michael Nash, 04 December 2005 - 10:41 PM.

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#7 Jason Debus

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 12:27 AM

I did some tests with my digital still camera and was successful in recreating the effect:

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The droplets didn't come out as sharp as I would have liked however.

The lens I used is pretty wide, a Canon 35mm 1.4L on an 350D (8MP). I used f1.4 with a 1/50 shutter. The glass with the water droplets are approx. 1 foot in front of the lens, the wine bottle approx. 3 feet away, and the backround lights at infinity.

I wish I understood how to acheive this effect better, would a zoom lens perhaps be better for this? I think also having a 35mm negative would help create larger bokeh which makes those other images so striking.

Any thoughts or pointers would be appreciated!
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#8 Tim J Durham

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 09:17 AM

I did some tests with my digital still camera and was successful in recreating the effect:

Posted Image

The droplets didn't come out as sharp as I would have liked however.

The lens I used is pretty wide, a Canon 35mm 1.4L on an 350D (8MP). I used f1.4 with a 1/50 shutter. The glass with the water droplets are approx. 1 foot in front of the lens, the wine bottle approx. 3 feet away, and the backround lights at infinity.

I wish I understood how to acheive this effect better, would a zoom lens perhaps be better for this? I think also having a 35mm negative would help create larger bokeh which makes those other images so striking.

Any thoughts or pointers would be appreciated!

You're only gonna get that with a longish telephoto.
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#9 Jason Debus

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Posted 09 January 2006 - 03:10 AM

Thanks for the tip on using on longer lens, I bought a relatively cheap canon 70-300mm to do some tests with. They came out better, but the textures aren't as sharp as I would like which I'm sure is because I used an el-cheapo lens. With the water, I bet it would work better if you used some of that windshield stuff that keeps the water off, to make it bead better. The glass I used just kind of ran and looked kind of mushy.

These shots are about 250mm, the glass is approx. 2 feet, the wine glass approx 10 feet.

Water
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Star Pattern
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Comb
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