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#1 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 10:56 AM

Hey guys I am in preproduction for a movie I am photographing for in January. I want all the interiors to have a cyan look to them. My question is do I tell the lab to do that or do I do it in th editing room with the editor. I am probally going to shoot on Fuji film. Tne new Eterna 500T and probally some 250 D.
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#2 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 12:26 PM

Are you editing traditionnaly or with an NLE system ? Are you going back to film or going to have a master tape ?

It's always better to filter on the camera, I think, I remember this look being discussed in these forums. Make a research I'm sure you'll find interesting things
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#3 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 02:04 PM

laurent
It will be edited traditionally, using Avid. I really want to achieve an overall cyan wah type of look. Something that is cool but not blueish. So I am wondering what gels, or filters will help me to achieve this affect. Also is this something that the processing will do?
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#4 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 02:35 PM

it will be edited traditionally, using Avid


:D :D :D

That's funny !

Students nowadays consider NLE (Non Linear Editing) is traditional !

No, you see, what we call "traditional editing" doesn't involve any computer !


Anyway... You can then achieve somehow the look you want in post. As for doing it at the shooting, have a look at some gel samples and find one that might look the way you want.

Also is this something that the processing will do?


The processing doesn't do anything of the kind (processing is developping the film). Printing can do, but do you print to film or do you end on a tape ?

Anyways, as you are editing on an Avid, you certainly will color time on the computer as well.
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#5 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 02:54 PM

A DP I worked with many years ago when I was focus pulling did just that trick. We had magenta filters on all the keylights and when the timer corrected the grey card, he naturally added cyan to get the key white, but then everything else got a cyan cast. It was a very nice look.

Or you can just add it in timing as an overall tone (but then the keylight and the ambience - if they match color temp wise - will have the same nuance), but that's a slightly different look.
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#6 Ry Kawanaka

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 04:02 PM

Doesn't magenta add more green rather than cyan?
I thought red would add cyan... Correct me if I'm wrong.

Also, not all the students nowadays consider Avid is the "traditional".:P

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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 04:23 PM

Yes, technically red is the opposite of cyan (blue + green). Magenta (red + blue) is the opposite of green.

So to fool a gray scale either some pale red light on the gray scale light, or a CC Red filter on the camera just for the gray scale (shot in white light). Or use cyan filters or gels for the scene. "The Woodsman" was shot through cyan filters, but they were using 800T stock.

I'd probably light interior night scenes with cyan-gelled lights and Cool White flourescents (after shooting the gray scale in white light), and use either a cyan filter outdoors, or when you don't have the light level, shoot a gray scale with a CC Red filter.
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#8 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 04:42 PM

Ok, maybe it was red, then. It's almost 8 years ago, I honestly don't remember exactly what filter it was except that it was red/magenta-ish. Anyway, the end was a cyan-tinted film.

Edited by AdamFrisch, 02 December 2005 - 04:44 PM.

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#9 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 10:37 AM

Thanks guys I ran some camera and lighting test last night, with a 800w red head and using cyan filters. We acheived some really nice pictures. I really do appreciate the help form all of you.
Thanks Guys
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